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Screening of leaf extraction and storage conditions for eco‐metabolomics studies


Lang, Jakob; Ramos, Sergio E; Smohunova, Marharyta; Bigler, Laurent; Schuman, Meredith Christine (2024). Screening of leaf extraction and storage conditions for eco‐metabolomics studies. Plant Direct, 8(4):e578.

Abstract

Mass spectrometry‐based plant metabolomics is frequently used to identify novel natural products or study the effect of specific treatments on a plant's metabolism. Reliable sample handling is required to avoid artifacts, which is why most protocols mandate shock freezing of plant tissue in liquid nitrogen and an uninterrupted cooling chain. However, the logistical challenges of this approach make it infeasible for many ecological studies. Especially for research in the tropics, permanent cooling poses a challenge, which is why many of those studies use dried leaf tissue instead. We screened a total of 10 extraction and storage approaches for plant metabolites extracted from maize leaf tissue across two cropping seasons to develop a methodology for agroecological studies in logistically challenging tropical locations. All methods were evaluated based on changes in the metabolite profile across a 2‐month storage period at different temperatures with the goal of reproducing the metabolite profile of the living plant as closely as possible. We show that our newly developed on‐site liquid–liquid extraction protocol provides a good compromise between sample replicability, extraction efficiency, material logistics, and metabolite profile stability. We further discuss alternative methods which showed promising results and feasibility of on‐site sample handling for field studies.

Abstract

Mass spectrometry‐based plant metabolomics is frequently used to identify novel natural products or study the effect of specific treatments on a plant's metabolism. Reliable sample handling is required to avoid artifacts, which is why most protocols mandate shock freezing of plant tissue in liquid nitrogen and an uninterrupted cooling chain. However, the logistical challenges of this approach make it infeasible for many ecological studies. Especially for research in the tropics, permanent cooling poses a challenge, which is why many of those studies use dried leaf tissue instead. We screened a total of 10 extraction and storage approaches for plant metabolites extracted from maize leaf tissue across two cropping seasons to develop a methodology for agroecological studies in logistically challenging tropical locations. All methods were evaluated based on changes in the metabolite profile across a 2‐month storage period at different temperatures with the goal of reproducing the metabolite profile of the living plant as closely as possible. We show that our newly developed on‐site liquid–liquid extraction protocol provides a good compromise between sample replicability, extraction efficiency, material logistics, and metabolite profile stability. We further discuss alternative methods which showed promising results and feasibility of on‐site sample handling for field studies.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
08 Research Priority Programs > Global Change and Biodiversity
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
540 Chemistry
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Physical Sciences > Ecology
Life Sciences > Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)
Life Sciences > Plant Science
Language:English
Date:1 April 2024
Deposited On:29 May 2024 15:13
Last Modified:30 Jun 2024 01:41
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:2475-4455
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/pld3.578
Project Information:
  • : FunderH2020
  • : Grant ID861998
  • : Project TitleUPSCALE - UPSCALING THE BENEFITS OF PUSH-PULL TECHNOLOGY FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL INTENSIFICATION IN EAST AFRICA
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)