Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Systematic review on the reporting accuracy of experimental details in publications using mouse femoral fracture models


Wolter, Angelique; Rapp, Anna E; Durst, Mattea S; Hildebrand, Laura; Löhning, Max; Buttgereit, Frank; Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Jirkof, Paulin; Lang, Annemarie (2021). Systematic review on the reporting accuracy of experimental details in publications using mouse femoral fracture models. Bone, 152:116088.

Abstract

The outcomes of animal experiments can be influenced by a variety of factors. Thus, precise reporting is necessary to provide reliable and reproducible data. Initiatives such as the ARRIVE guidelines have been enrolled during the last decade to provide a road map for sufficient reporting. To understand the sophisticated process of bone regeneration and to develop new therapeutic strategies, small rodents, especially mice, are frequently used in bone healing research. Since many factors might influence the results from those studies, we performed a systematic literature search from 2010 to 2019 to identify studies involving mouse femoral fracture models (stable fixation) and evaluated the reporting of general and model-specific experimental details. 254 pre-selected publications were systematically analyzed, showing a high reporting accuracy for the used mouse strain, the age or developmental stage and sex of mice as well as model-specific information on fixation methods and fracturing procedures. However, reporting was more often insufficient in terms of mouse substrains and genetic backgrounds of genetically modified mice, body weight, hygiene monitoring/immune status of the animal, anesthesia, and analgesia. Consistent and reliable reporting of experimental variables in mouse fracture surgeries will improve scientific quality, enhance animal welfare, and foster translation into the clinic.

Abstract

The outcomes of animal experiments can be influenced by a variety of factors. Thus, precise reporting is necessary to provide reliable and reproducible data. Initiatives such as the ARRIVE guidelines have been enrolled during the last decade to provide a road map for sufficient reporting. To understand the sophisticated process of bone regeneration and to develop new therapeutic strategies, small rodents, especially mice, are frequently used in bone healing research. Since many factors might influence the results from those studies, we performed a systematic literature search from 2010 to 2019 to identify studies involving mouse femoral fracture models (stable fixation) and evaluated the reporting of general and model-specific experimental details. 254 pre-selected publications were systematically analyzed, showing a high reporting accuracy for the used mouse strain, the age or developmental stage and sex of mice as well as model-specific information on fixation methods and fracturing procedures. However, reporting was more often insufficient in terms of mouse substrains and genetic backgrounds of genetically modified mice, body weight, hygiene monitoring/immune status of the animal, anesthesia, and analgesia. Consistent and reliable reporting of experimental variables in mouse fracture surgeries will improve scientific quality, enhance animal welfare, and foster translation into the clinic.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
5 citations in Web of Science®
5 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 13 Jun 2024
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:08 Research Priority Programs > Animal Welfare and 3Rs
Dewey Decimal Classification:500 Natural Sciences and mathematics
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
Life Sciences > Physiology
Health Sciences > Histology
Uncontrolled Keywords:systematic review, 3R, ARRIVE, osteotomy, mouse
Language:English
Date:November 2021
Deposited On:13 Jun 2024 13:06
Last Modified:14 Jun 2024 20:01
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1873-2763
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2021.116088
PubMed ID:34175502