Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Inverse association between slow-wave sleep and low-grade inflammation in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder


Strumberger, Michael A; Häberling, Isabelle; Emery, Sophie; Albermann, Mona; Baumgartner, Noemi; Pedrett, Catrina; Wild, Salome; Contin-Waldvogel, Brigitte; Walitza, Susanne; Berger, Gregor; Schmeck, Klaus; Cajochen, Christian (2024). Inverse association between slow-wave sleep and low-grade inflammation in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder. Sleep Medicine, 119:103-113.

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the relationship between both self-reported and objective sleep variables and low-grade inflammation in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) of moderate to severe symptom severity.

Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we examined twenty-nine children and adolescents diagnosed with MDD and twenty-nine healthy controls (HC). Following a one-week actigraphy assessment, comprehensive sleep evaluations were conducted, including a one-night sleep EEG measurement and self-reported sleep data. Plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) was employed as a marker to assess low-grade inflammation.

Results: No significant difference in hsCRP levels was observed between participants with MDD and HC. Furthermore, after adjusting for sleep difficulties, hsCRP exhibited no correlation with the severity of depressive symptoms. In HC, levels of hsCRP were not linked to self-reported and objective sleep variables. In contrast, depressed participants showed a significant correlation between hsCRP levels and increased subjective insomnia severity (Insomnia Severity Index; r = 0.41, p < 0.05), increased time spent in the N2 sleep stage (r = 0.47, p < 0.01), and decreased time spent in slow-wave sleep (r = - 0.61, p < 0.001). Upon additional adjustments for body mass index, tobacco use and depression severity, only the inverse association between hsCRP and time spent in slow-wave sleep retained statistical significance. Moderation analysis indicated that group status (MDD vs. HC) significantly moderates the association between slow-wave sleep and hsCRP.

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that alterations in the architecture of slow-wave sleep may have a significant influence on modulating low-grade inflammatory processes in children and adolescents with MDD.

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the relationship between both self-reported and objective sleep variables and low-grade inflammation in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) of moderate to severe symptom severity.

Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we examined twenty-nine children and adolescents diagnosed with MDD and twenty-nine healthy controls (HC). Following a one-week actigraphy assessment, comprehensive sleep evaluations were conducted, including a one-night sleep EEG measurement and self-reported sleep data. Plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) was employed as a marker to assess low-grade inflammation.

Results: No significant difference in hsCRP levels was observed between participants with MDD and HC. Furthermore, after adjusting for sleep difficulties, hsCRP exhibited no correlation with the severity of depressive symptoms. In HC, levels of hsCRP were not linked to self-reported and objective sleep variables. In contrast, depressed participants showed a significant correlation between hsCRP levels and increased subjective insomnia severity (Insomnia Severity Index; r = 0.41, p < 0.05), increased time spent in the N2 sleep stage (r = 0.47, p < 0.01), and decreased time spent in slow-wave sleep (r = - 0.61, p < 0.001). Upon additional adjustments for body mass index, tobacco use and depression severity, only the inverse association between hsCRP and time spent in slow-wave sleep retained statistical significance. Moderation analysis indicated that group status (MDD vs. HC) significantly moderates the association between slow-wave sleep and hsCRP.

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that alterations in the architecture of slow-wave sleep may have a significant influence on modulating low-grade inflammatory processes in children and adolescents with MDD.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 10 Jul 2024
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Medicine
Uncontrolled Keywords:Adolescence; C-reactive protein; Depression; Inflammation; Sleep disturbance; Slow-wave sleep.
Language:English
Date:July 2024
Deposited On:10 Jul 2024 13:02
Last Modified:11 Jul 2024 20:00
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1389-9457
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2024.04.007
PubMed ID:38669833
Project Information:
  • : FunderSwiss National Science Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title