Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Structure, folding and interactions of membrane-associated biomolecules studied by NMR


Mareš, Jiří. Structure, folding and interactions of membrane-associated biomolecules studied by NMR. 2009, University of Zurich, Faculty of Science.

Abstract

In the course of my doctoral studies I focused on the characterization of the structure and folding of membrane-interacting molecules such as the neuropeptide peptide YY (PYY), glycolipids derived from gp120, or polymyxins and their interactions with the membrane-surface components such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Studies of structure and folding were caried out on PYY, a small peptide for which membrane association was postulated by us previously, whereas the study on the glycolipid-cyanovirin and polymyxin-lipopolysaccharid systems focused on the interaction between peptides/proteins and carbohydrates. Some of the peptides from the neuropeptide Y family are know to adopt a relatively stable and well-defined helical hairpin structure in water. The characteristic hairpin formed by a polyproline helix associated with an α-helix results in a particular type of teriary structure known also as the PP-fold. The latter was first determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis of the avian pancreatic peptide (aPP). In this work we have investigated the significance of contacts between resuides from the α-helix and the polyproline helix for forming tertiary structure. In order to do so we redetermined the structure of PYY in water using an extended set of NOEs complemented by RDCs. These data helped to significantly increase the resolution of the structure, and to propose details important for the particular nature of tertiary interactions. The most remarkable improvement was obtained for the turn region linking these two helices. The tertiary interactions are formed by specific Tyr-Pro contacts, and similar contacts are observed in other peptides of the family, that form the characteristic PP-fold. Furthermore, the importance of these interactions was analysed by substituting them via site-directed mutagenesis. Subsequent characterization of their dynamics was carried out by measuring heteronuclear 15N{1H}-NOE data, as well as chemical shift changes during thermal and solvent induced (un)folding of wild type PYY. The unfolding was followed by tracking the changes of the C-α chemical shifts. The thermal denaturation revealed concerted changes occurring at all atoms observed, and according to the cooperative nature of the changes, classified PYY as a two-state folder. The solvent denaturation was performed by stepwise changing the solvent system from pure water to pure methanol in 10% intervals, while the other conditions were kept constant. In previous work of our group, methanol was shown to mimic well the environment at the water-membrane interface. As an example, it was shown, that the structure of PYY in DPC micelles lacked tertiary contacts and is very similar to the one present in methanol. Therefore, the methanol denaturation resembles structural changes accompanying increasing participation in membrane-surface contacts. This study determined the concentration at which the tertiary structure denatures, but it also revealed rigidification of secondary structures at high methanol concentrations. The complex methanol unfolding curves also revealed a dramatic alteration of proline isomerization dynamics. The second part of my doctoral work focused on studying a glycolipid, derived from the carbohydrate portion of the HIV glycoprotein gp120, incorporated into DPC micelles as a membrane model. In order to validate recognition of this memrane- incorporated glycolipid model, its interaction with a carbohydrate-recognizing protein was studied by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In cooperation with Prof. Schmidt from the University of Konstanz a terminal arm of the high-mannose structure of the HIV surface-envelope protein gp120 was synthesized as the mono- di- and tri- mannose moiety linked to an aliphatic membrane anchor. I have then characterized the insertion of this glycolipid into DPC micelles using spin-labels and by measuring the changes in translation diffusion rates by NMR techniques. Cyanovirin (CV-N) is cyanobacterial lectin, which binds the above-mentioned high-mannose arm of gp120, thereby preventing HIV virus cell entry. A 15N isotopically labeled CV-N was used in chemical shift mapping studies to monitor its interaction with the micelle-anchored glycolipid. The results proved that CV-N recognizes properly the micelle-anchored glycolipid. Using DPC-incorporated spin labels, it was further confirmed that upon CV-N binding the glycolipid remains anchored into the DPC micelles. It could be shown, that binding occurs at the same sites as for the free dimannoside. In contrast to hydrophobic tertiary interactions of PYY, these interactions include polar groups, which were not disrupted by the membrane environment. Additionally, upon competition with the better ligand trimannoside, we detected detachment of the DPC-micelle-bound CV-N. We envisage that this system may become useful for the reversible attachment of biomolecules to membrane surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) forms the main constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. LPS is also known for its toxic effects. Septic shock, with a mortality rate of about 50%, is a result of hyperactivation of the immune system and is caused in 70% of cases by LPS. This negatively charged molecule inevitably interacts with cationic antimicrobial peptides, such as polymyxins (PMXs). The strong interaction leads to disruption of the integrity of the outer membrane and may suppress the septic shock initiated by LPS molecules released from disrupted bacterial membranes. In the last part of this thesis work we investigated the LPS-polymyxin interaction. We have chosen a bacterial strain producing a simple form of LPS. A purification method was developed that consisted of an extraction protocol, used before, and a new HPLC chromatography step in combination with an optimized ternary solvent mixture. This procedure facilitated production of the isotopically labeled and chemically defined compound in high purity. Various techniques of heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy allowed observing its insertion in DPC micelles. Furthermore, characterization of the LPS-polymyxin interaction was performed using commercially available polymyxin-B and -E, as well as polymyxin-M (PMX-M), which was expressed, isolated and purified in house. Chemical shift mapping was performed by measuring carbon-proton HSQC experiments of isotopically labeled LPS and unlabeled peptides. In addition, in a complementary experiment isotopically labeled polymyxin-M and unlabeled LPS were used. The data enabled us to localize the interaction sites between LPS and polymyxins. Additional information was derived from isotope-filtered NOESY experiments using 13C-labeled LPS and unlabeled polymyxins. Since the signals of the majority of atoms involved in the intermolecular interaction cannot be observed due to linebroading caused by exchange effects, NOESY experiments did not provide sufficient information for the determination of the LPS-PMX complex at reasonable detail. We have employed a combination of simulated annealing and molecular dynamics calculation to determine the possible structure of the LPS-PMX complex in presence of micelles. The simulated annealing utilized sparse experimental restrains derived from the isotope-filtered NOESY and generated a large set of conformers. Analysis of the obtained set allowed selection of those structures, where the intermolecular contacts were in agreement with the chemical shift mapping patterns. Further refinement and analysis was performed by molecular dynamics calculation. Both solvent (water) and cosolvent (DPC) molecules were explicitly included in the calculation. In this work, we have prepared and characterized all the constituents of the complex biological interaction, proposed the structure of the complex and characterized the nature of the interacting moieties.


Zusammenfassung
Während meiner Doktorarbeit habe ich mich auf die Charakterisierung der Struktur und der Faltung von membran-interagierenden Molekülen konzentriert, darunter das Neuropeptid YY (PYY), Glycolipide abstammend von gp120, und Polymyxine und ihre Interaktionen mit Membranoberflächenkomponenten wie Lipoposacchariden (LPS). Die Struktur- und Faltungsstudie wurde mit PYY, einem kleinen Peptid, durchgeführt, für welches von uns im Vorfeld Membranassoziation postuliert wurde, während die Untersuchung der Glycolipid-Cyanovirin- und Polymyxin-Liposaccharid-Systeme sich auf die Interaktion zwischen Peptid/Protein und Kohlehydraten konzentrierte. Einige der Peptide der Neuropeptid Y Familie sind dafür bekannt eine relativ stabile und gut definierte helikale “Haarnadel”-Struktur in Wasser anzunehmen. Die charakteristische “Haarnadel”, die durch eine Polyprolin-Helix assoziiert mit einer α- Helix gebildet wird, resultiert in einem bestimmten Typ von Tertiärstruktur, bekannt als PP-Faltung. Letztere wurde zuerst durch röntgenkristallographische Untersuchung des pankreatischen Peptides aPP in Vögeln bestimmt. In dieser Arbeit haben wir die Bedeutung von den Kontakten zwischen Resten der α- Helix und der Polyprolin-Helix untersucht, die die Tertiärstruktur bilden. Um dies zu tun, haben wir die bekannte Struktur von PYY in Wasser mittels eines erweiterten Sets von NOEs und RDCs verfeinert. Diese Daten halfen, die Auflösung der Struktur signifikant zu verbessern, und Details vorzuschlagen, die wichtig für die besondere Natur der Tertiärinteraktionen sind. Die bemerkenswerteste Verbesserung wurde für die, die zwei Helices verbindende “turn”-Region erhalten. Die Tertiärinteraktionen werden von spezifischen Tyr-Pro-Kontakten gebildet, und ähnliche Kontakte werden in anderen Peptiden der Familie beobachtet, die die charakteristische ”PP-Faltung” zeigen. Ausserdem wurde die Bedeutung dieser Interaktionen durch Punktmutationen analysiert. Anschliessend wurde die Dynamik durch Messen der heteronuklearen 15 N{1H}-NOE Daten, sowie die Änderung während dem thermischem und lösungsmittel-induzierten (Ent)Falten von PYY charakterisiert. Das Entfalten wurde beobachtet anhand der Änderung der chemischen Verschiebung der C-α Atome. Die thermische Denaturierung zeigte konzertierte Änderungen bei allen beobachteten Atomen, und aufgrund der kooperativen Natur der Änderungen, wurde PYY als Zweizustands-Falter klassifiziert. Die Lösungsmitteldenaturierung wurde mittels schrittweisem Ändern des Lösungssystems von reinem Wasser zu reinem Methanol in 10 % -Intervallen durchgeführt, während die anderen Bedingungen konstant gehalten wurden. In früheren Arbeiten unserer Gruppe wurde gezeigt, dass Methanol die Umgebung an der Wasser-Membran-Grenzfläche gut nachahmt. Als ein Beispiel wurde gezeigt, dass die Struktur von PYY in DPC-Micellen keine Tertiärkontakte aufwies und dass sie der in Methanol sehr ähnlich ist. Daher ähnelt die Methanol- Denaturierung strukturellen Änderungen, die zunehmende Beteiligung in Membranoberflächenkontakten begleiten. Diese Untersuchung bestimmte die Konzentration, bei der die Tertiärstruktur denaturiert, aber sie zeigte auch eine rigidere Sekundärstruktur bei hohen Methanolkonzentrationen. Die komplexen Methanol-Entfaltungskurven zeigten auch eine drastische Änderung der Prolin- Isomerisierungsdynamik. Der zweite Teil meiner Doktorarbeit konzentrierte sich auf die Studie eines Glykolipids, das vom Kohlenhydratanteil des HIV Glykoproteins gp120 abstammt, welches in DPC-Micellen als Membranmodel inkorporiert wurde. Um die Erkennung dieses membraninkorporierten Glykolipid-Models zu validieren, wurde seine Interaktion mit einem kohlenhydrat-erkennenden Protein mittels hochauflösender NMR-Spektroskopie untersucht. In Kooperation mit Prof. Schmidt von der Universität Konstanz wurde ein terminaler Arm der “high-mannose-structure” des HIV-Oberflächen-Hüllen-Proteins gp120 als Mono-, Di- und Tri-Mannoseteil verbunden mit einem aliphatischen Membrananker synthetisiert. Daraufhin wurde die Einfügung dieses Glykolipids in DPC Micellen mittels “spin labels” und durch die Messung der Änderungen der Translationsdiffusionsraten mit NMR-Techniken charakterisiert. Cyanovirin (CV-N) ist ein cyanobakterielles Lectin, das den oben erwähnten “high-mannose arm” von gp120 bindet und dadurch den HIV Virus am Eintritt in die Zelle hindert. Ein 15N-isotopenmarkiertes CV-N wurde für “chemical shift mapping”- Studien verwendet, um seine Interaktion mit dem micellenverankerten Glykolipid zu beobachten. Die Ergebnisse bewiesen, dass CV-N das micellenverankerte Glykolipid richtig erkennt. Mit den DPC-inkorporierten “spin labels” wurde ausserdem bestätigt, dass das Glycolipid während der CV-N-Bindung in den DPC Micellen verankert bleibt. Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass die Bindung an den gleichen Stellen wie bei Bindung der freien Dimannose stattfindet. Im Gegensatz zu hydrophoben Tertiärinteraktionen von PYY wurden diese Interaktionen, die polare Gruppen einschliessen, nicht durch die Membranumgebung aufgebrochen. Zusätzlich haben wir unter Kompetition mit dem besseren Liganden Trimannosid die Ablösung des DPC-micellengebundenen CV-N detektiert. Wir stellen uns vor, dass dieses System für die reversible Bindung von Biomolekülen an Membranoberflächen nützlich sein könnte. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) bilden den Hauptbestandteil der äusseren Membran von gram-negativen Bakterien. LPS ist auch für seine toxischen Effekte bekannt. Septische Schocks mit einer Sterberate von 50 % sind die Folge einer Hyperaktivierung des Immunsystems, welche in 70 % aller Fälle durch LPS verursacht wird. Dieses negativ geladene Molekül interagiert zwangsläufig mit kationischen antimikrobiellen Peptiden zum Beispiel Polymyxinen (PMXs). Die starke Interaktion führt zur Aufbrechung der Integrität der äusseren Membran und kann den septischen Schock unterdrücken, welcher durch von der zerstörten Bakterienmembran freigewordenen LPS-Molekülen ausgelöst wird. Im letzten Teil dieser Doktorarbeit haben wir die LPS-Polymyxin-Interaktion untersucht. Wir haben einen Bakterienstamm gewählt, der eine einfache Form von LPS produziert. Es wurde eine Aufreinigungsmethode entwickelt, die aus einem bereits etablierten Extraktionsprotokoll und einem zusätzlichen HPLC-Chromatographieschritt in Kombination mit einer optimierten ternären Lösungsmittelmischung bestand. Diese Prozedur ermöglichte die Produktion der isotopenmarkierten und chemisch definierten Verbindung mit einem hohen Reinheitsgrad. Verschiedene Techniken der heteronuklearen NMR-Spektroskopie erlaubten es, ihre Einfügung in die DPC Micellen zu beobachten. Ausserdem wurde die LPS-Polymyxin-M-Interaktion sowohl anhand von kommerziell erhältlichem Polymyxin-B und –E, als auch Polymyxin-M (PMX-M), welches im Haus exprimiert, isoliert und aufgereinigt wurde, charakterisiert. „Chemical shift mapping“ wurde durch Messen von Kohlenstoff-Protonen-HSQC-Experimenten mit isotopenmarkiertem LPS und unmarkierten Peptiden durchgeführt. Zusätzlich, in einem anderen komplementären Experiment wurden isotopenmarkiertes Polymyxin- M und unmarkiertes LPS benutzt. Die Daten erlaubten uns, die Interaktionsstellen zwischen LPS und Polymyxin-M zu lokalisieren. Zusätzliche Information wurde von isotopengefilterten NOESY-Experimenten mit 13C-markiertem LPS und unmarkiertem Polymyxin erhalten. Da die Signale der meisten Atome, die in die intermolekulare Interaktion involviert sind, wegen durch Austauscheffekte verursachten Linienverbreiterungen nicht beobachtet werden können, konnten die NOESY-Experimente nicht genügend Information für die Bestimmung des LPS- PMX-Komplexes in ausreichendem Detailgrad liefern. Wir haben eine Kombination von simuliertem ‘Annealing’ und Molekulardynamikberechnungen benutzt, um eine mögliche Struktur des LPS-PMX-Komplexes in Anwesenheit von Micellen zu bestimmen. Das simulierte ‘Annealing’ benutzte wenige experimentelle Einschränkungen, die von dem isotopengefilterten NOESY abgeleitet wurden und generierte ein grosses Set an Konformeren. Die Analyse des erhaltenen Sets erlaubte eine Selektion der Strukturen, in denen die intermolekularen Kontakte im Einverständnis mit dem ‘chemical shift mapping’-Muster waren. Eine weitere Verfeinerung und Analyse wurde durch eine ‘molecular dynamics’ Simulation durchgeführt. Sowohl die Lösungsmittel- (Wasser) als auch die Kolösungsmittelmoleküle (DPC) wurden explizit in der Simulation eingeschlossen. In dieser Arbeit haben wir alle Bestandteile der untersuchten komplexen biologischen Interaktion hergestellt und charakterisiert, wir haben eine Struktur des Komplexes vorgeschlagen und die Eigenschaften der interagierenden Teile charakterisiert.

Abstract

In the course of my doctoral studies I focused on the characterization of the structure and folding of membrane-interacting molecules such as the neuropeptide peptide YY (PYY), glycolipids derived from gp120, or polymyxins and their interactions with the membrane-surface components such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Studies of structure and folding were caried out on PYY, a small peptide for which membrane association was postulated by us previously, whereas the study on the glycolipid-cyanovirin and polymyxin-lipopolysaccharid systems focused on the interaction between peptides/proteins and carbohydrates. Some of the peptides from the neuropeptide Y family are know to adopt a relatively stable and well-defined helical hairpin structure in water. The characteristic hairpin formed by a polyproline helix associated with an α-helix results in a particular type of teriary structure known also as the PP-fold. The latter was first determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis of the avian pancreatic peptide (aPP). In this work we have investigated the significance of contacts between resuides from the α-helix and the polyproline helix for forming tertiary structure. In order to do so we redetermined the structure of PYY in water using an extended set of NOEs complemented by RDCs. These data helped to significantly increase the resolution of the structure, and to propose details important for the particular nature of tertiary interactions. The most remarkable improvement was obtained for the turn region linking these two helices. The tertiary interactions are formed by specific Tyr-Pro contacts, and similar contacts are observed in other peptides of the family, that form the characteristic PP-fold. Furthermore, the importance of these interactions was analysed by substituting them via site-directed mutagenesis. Subsequent characterization of their dynamics was carried out by measuring heteronuclear 15N{1H}-NOE data, as well as chemical shift changes during thermal and solvent induced (un)folding of wild type PYY. The unfolding was followed by tracking the changes of the C-α chemical shifts. The thermal denaturation revealed concerted changes occurring at all atoms observed, and according to the cooperative nature of the changes, classified PYY as a two-state folder. The solvent denaturation was performed by stepwise changing the solvent system from pure water to pure methanol in 10% intervals, while the other conditions were kept constant. In previous work of our group, methanol was shown to mimic well the environment at the water-membrane interface. As an example, it was shown, that the structure of PYY in DPC micelles lacked tertiary contacts and is very similar to the one present in methanol. Therefore, the methanol denaturation resembles structural changes accompanying increasing participation in membrane-surface contacts. This study determined the concentration at which the tertiary structure denatures, but it also revealed rigidification of secondary structures at high methanol concentrations. The complex methanol unfolding curves also revealed a dramatic alteration of proline isomerization dynamics. The second part of my doctoral work focused on studying a glycolipid, derived from the carbohydrate portion of the HIV glycoprotein gp120, incorporated into DPC micelles as a membrane model. In order to validate recognition of this memrane- incorporated glycolipid model, its interaction with a carbohydrate-recognizing protein was studied by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In cooperation with Prof. Schmidt from the University of Konstanz a terminal arm of the high-mannose structure of the HIV surface-envelope protein gp120 was synthesized as the mono- di- and tri- mannose moiety linked to an aliphatic membrane anchor. I have then characterized the insertion of this glycolipid into DPC micelles using spin-labels and by measuring the changes in translation diffusion rates by NMR techniques. Cyanovirin (CV-N) is cyanobacterial lectin, which binds the above-mentioned high-mannose arm of gp120, thereby preventing HIV virus cell entry. A 15N isotopically labeled CV-N was used in chemical shift mapping studies to monitor its interaction with the micelle-anchored glycolipid. The results proved that CV-N recognizes properly the micelle-anchored glycolipid. Using DPC-incorporated spin labels, it was further confirmed that upon CV-N binding the glycolipid remains anchored into the DPC micelles. It could be shown, that binding occurs at the same sites as for the free dimannoside. In contrast to hydrophobic tertiary interactions of PYY, these interactions include polar groups, which were not disrupted by the membrane environment. Additionally, upon competition with the better ligand trimannoside, we detected detachment of the DPC-micelle-bound CV-N. We envisage that this system may become useful for the reversible attachment of biomolecules to membrane surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) forms the main constituent of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. LPS is also known for its toxic effects. Septic shock, with a mortality rate of about 50%, is a result of hyperactivation of the immune system and is caused in 70% of cases by LPS. This negatively charged molecule inevitably interacts with cationic antimicrobial peptides, such as polymyxins (PMXs). The strong interaction leads to disruption of the integrity of the outer membrane and may suppress the septic shock initiated by LPS molecules released from disrupted bacterial membranes. In the last part of this thesis work we investigated the LPS-polymyxin interaction. We have chosen a bacterial strain producing a simple form of LPS. A purification method was developed that consisted of an extraction protocol, used before, and a new HPLC chromatography step in combination with an optimized ternary solvent mixture. This procedure facilitated production of the isotopically labeled and chemically defined compound in high purity. Various techniques of heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy allowed observing its insertion in DPC micelles. Furthermore, characterization of the LPS-polymyxin interaction was performed using commercially available polymyxin-B and -E, as well as polymyxin-M (PMX-M), which was expressed, isolated and purified in house. Chemical shift mapping was performed by measuring carbon-proton HSQC experiments of isotopically labeled LPS and unlabeled peptides. In addition, in a complementary experiment isotopically labeled polymyxin-M and unlabeled LPS were used. The data enabled us to localize the interaction sites between LPS and polymyxins. Additional information was derived from isotope-filtered NOESY experiments using 13C-labeled LPS and unlabeled polymyxins. Since the signals of the majority of atoms involved in the intermolecular interaction cannot be observed due to linebroading caused by exchange effects, NOESY experiments did not provide sufficient information for the determination of the LPS-PMX complex at reasonable detail. We have employed a combination of simulated annealing and molecular dynamics calculation to determine the possible structure of the LPS-PMX complex in presence of micelles. The simulated annealing utilized sparse experimental restrains derived from the isotope-filtered NOESY and generated a large set of conformers. Analysis of the obtained set allowed selection of those structures, where the intermolecular contacts were in agreement with the chemical shift mapping patterns. Further refinement and analysis was performed by molecular dynamics calculation. Both solvent (water) and cosolvent (DPC) molecules were explicitly included in the calculation. In this work, we have prepared and characterized all the constituents of the complex biological interaction, proposed the structure of the complex and characterized the nature of the interacting moieties.


Zusammenfassung
Während meiner Doktorarbeit habe ich mich auf die Charakterisierung der Struktur und der Faltung von membran-interagierenden Molekülen konzentriert, darunter das Neuropeptid YY (PYY), Glycolipide abstammend von gp120, und Polymyxine und ihre Interaktionen mit Membranoberflächenkomponenten wie Lipoposacchariden (LPS). Die Struktur- und Faltungsstudie wurde mit PYY, einem kleinen Peptid, durchgeführt, für welches von uns im Vorfeld Membranassoziation postuliert wurde, während die Untersuchung der Glycolipid-Cyanovirin- und Polymyxin-Liposaccharid-Systeme sich auf die Interaktion zwischen Peptid/Protein und Kohlehydraten konzentrierte. Einige der Peptide der Neuropeptid Y Familie sind dafür bekannt eine relativ stabile und gut definierte helikale “Haarnadel”-Struktur in Wasser anzunehmen. Die charakteristische “Haarnadel”, die durch eine Polyprolin-Helix assoziiert mit einer α- Helix gebildet wird, resultiert in einem bestimmten Typ von Tertiärstruktur, bekannt als PP-Faltung. Letztere wurde zuerst durch röntgenkristallographische Untersuchung des pankreatischen Peptides aPP in Vögeln bestimmt. In dieser Arbeit haben wir die Bedeutung von den Kontakten zwischen Resten der α- Helix und der Polyprolin-Helix untersucht, die die Tertiärstruktur bilden. Um dies zu tun, haben wir die bekannte Struktur von PYY in Wasser mittels eines erweiterten Sets von NOEs und RDCs verfeinert. Diese Daten halfen, die Auflösung der Struktur signifikant zu verbessern, und Details vorzuschlagen, die wichtig für die besondere Natur der Tertiärinteraktionen sind. Die bemerkenswerteste Verbesserung wurde für die, die zwei Helices verbindende “turn”-Region erhalten. Die Tertiärinteraktionen werden von spezifischen Tyr-Pro-Kontakten gebildet, und ähnliche Kontakte werden in anderen Peptiden der Familie beobachtet, die die charakteristische ”PP-Faltung” zeigen. Ausserdem wurde die Bedeutung dieser Interaktionen durch Punktmutationen analysiert. Anschliessend wurde die Dynamik durch Messen der heteronuklearen 15 N{1H}-NOE Daten, sowie die Änderung während dem thermischem und lösungsmittel-induzierten (Ent)Falten von PYY charakterisiert. Das Entfalten wurde beobachtet anhand der Änderung der chemischen Verschiebung der C-α Atome. Die thermische Denaturierung zeigte konzertierte Änderungen bei allen beobachteten Atomen, und aufgrund der kooperativen Natur der Änderungen, wurde PYY als Zweizustands-Falter klassifiziert. Die Lösungsmitteldenaturierung wurde mittels schrittweisem Ändern des Lösungssystems von reinem Wasser zu reinem Methanol in 10 % -Intervallen durchgeführt, während die anderen Bedingungen konstant gehalten wurden. In früheren Arbeiten unserer Gruppe wurde gezeigt, dass Methanol die Umgebung an der Wasser-Membran-Grenzfläche gut nachahmt. Als ein Beispiel wurde gezeigt, dass die Struktur von PYY in DPC-Micellen keine Tertiärkontakte aufwies und dass sie der in Methanol sehr ähnlich ist. Daher ähnelt die Methanol- Denaturierung strukturellen Änderungen, die zunehmende Beteiligung in Membranoberflächenkontakten begleiten. Diese Untersuchung bestimmte die Konzentration, bei der die Tertiärstruktur denaturiert, aber sie zeigte auch eine rigidere Sekundärstruktur bei hohen Methanolkonzentrationen. Die komplexen Methanol-Entfaltungskurven zeigten auch eine drastische Änderung der Prolin- Isomerisierungsdynamik. Der zweite Teil meiner Doktorarbeit konzentrierte sich auf die Studie eines Glykolipids, das vom Kohlenhydratanteil des HIV Glykoproteins gp120 abstammt, welches in DPC-Micellen als Membranmodel inkorporiert wurde. Um die Erkennung dieses membraninkorporierten Glykolipid-Models zu validieren, wurde seine Interaktion mit einem kohlenhydrat-erkennenden Protein mittels hochauflösender NMR-Spektroskopie untersucht. In Kooperation mit Prof. Schmidt von der Universität Konstanz wurde ein terminaler Arm der “high-mannose-structure” des HIV-Oberflächen-Hüllen-Proteins gp120 als Mono-, Di- und Tri-Mannoseteil verbunden mit einem aliphatischen Membrananker synthetisiert. Daraufhin wurde die Einfügung dieses Glykolipids in DPC Micellen mittels “spin labels” und durch die Messung der Änderungen der Translationsdiffusionsraten mit NMR-Techniken charakterisiert. Cyanovirin (CV-N) ist ein cyanobakterielles Lectin, das den oben erwähnten “high-mannose arm” von gp120 bindet und dadurch den HIV Virus am Eintritt in die Zelle hindert. Ein 15N-isotopenmarkiertes CV-N wurde für “chemical shift mapping”- Studien verwendet, um seine Interaktion mit dem micellenverankerten Glykolipid zu beobachten. Die Ergebnisse bewiesen, dass CV-N das micellenverankerte Glykolipid richtig erkennt. Mit den DPC-inkorporierten “spin labels” wurde ausserdem bestätigt, dass das Glycolipid während der CV-N-Bindung in den DPC Micellen verankert bleibt. Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass die Bindung an den gleichen Stellen wie bei Bindung der freien Dimannose stattfindet. Im Gegensatz zu hydrophoben Tertiärinteraktionen von PYY wurden diese Interaktionen, die polare Gruppen einschliessen, nicht durch die Membranumgebung aufgebrochen. Zusätzlich haben wir unter Kompetition mit dem besseren Liganden Trimannosid die Ablösung des DPC-micellengebundenen CV-N detektiert. Wir stellen uns vor, dass dieses System für die reversible Bindung von Biomolekülen an Membranoberflächen nützlich sein könnte. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) bilden den Hauptbestandteil der äusseren Membran von gram-negativen Bakterien. LPS ist auch für seine toxischen Effekte bekannt. Septische Schocks mit einer Sterberate von 50 % sind die Folge einer Hyperaktivierung des Immunsystems, welche in 70 % aller Fälle durch LPS verursacht wird. Dieses negativ geladene Molekül interagiert zwangsläufig mit kationischen antimikrobiellen Peptiden zum Beispiel Polymyxinen (PMXs). Die starke Interaktion führt zur Aufbrechung der Integrität der äusseren Membran und kann den septischen Schock unterdrücken, welcher durch von der zerstörten Bakterienmembran freigewordenen LPS-Molekülen ausgelöst wird. Im letzten Teil dieser Doktorarbeit haben wir die LPS-Polymyxin-Interaktion untersucht. Wir haben einen Bakterienstamm gewählt, der eine einfache Form von LPS produziert. Es wurde eine Aufreinigungsmethode entwickelt, die aus einem bereits etablierten Extraktionsprotokoll und einem zusätzlichen HPLC-Chromatographieschritt in Kombination mit einer optimierten ternären Lösungsmittelmischung bestand. Diese Prozedur ermöglichte die Produktion der isotopenmarkierten und chemisch definierten Verbindung mit einem hohen Reinheitsgrad. Verschiedene Techniken der heteronuklearen NMR-Spektroskopie erlaubten es, ihre Einfügung in die DPC Micellen zu beobachten. Ausserdem wurde die LPS-Polymyxin-M-Interaktion sowohl anhand von kommerziell erhältlichem Polymyxin-B und –E, als auch Polymyxin-M (PMX-M), welches im Haus exprimiert, isoliert und aufgereinigt wurde, charakterisiert. „Chemical shift mapping“ wurde durch Messen von Kohlenstoff-Protonen-HSQC-Experimenten mit isotopenmarkiertem LPS und unmarkierten Peptiden durchgeführt. Zusätzlich, in einem anderen komplementären Experiment wurden isotopenmarkiertes Polymyxin- M und unmarkiertes LPS benutzt. Die Daten erlaubten uns, die Interaktionsstellen zwischen LPS und Polymyxin-M zu lokalisieren. Zusätzliche Information wurde von isotopengefilterten NOESY-Experimenten mit 13C-markiertem LPS und unmarkiertem Polymyxin erhalten. Da die Signale der meisten Atome, die in die intermolekulare Interaktion involviert sind, wegen durch Austauscheffekte verursachten Linienverbreiterungen nicht beobachtet werden können, konnten die NOESY-Experimente nicht genügend Information für die Bestimmung des LPS- PMX-Komplexes in ausreichendem Detailgrad liefern. Wir haben eine Kombination von simuliertem ‘Annealing’ und Molekulardynamikberechnungen benutzt, um eine mögliche Struktur des LPS-PMX-Komplexes in Anwesenheit von Micellen zu bestimmen. Das simulierte ‘Annealing’ benutzte wenige experimentelle Einschränkungen, die von dem isotopengefilterten NOESY abgeleitet wurden und generierte ein grosses Set an Konformeren. Die Analyse des erhaltenen Sets erlaubte eine Selektion der Strukturen, in denen die intermolekularen Kontakte im Einverständnis mit dem ‘chemical shift mapping’-Muster waren. Eine weitere Verfeinerung und Analyse wurde durch eine ‘molecular dynamics’ Simulation durchgeführt. Sowohl die Lösungsmittel- (Wasser) als auch die Kolösungsmittelmoleküle (DPC) wurden explizit in der Simulation eingeschlossen. In dieser Arbeit haben wir alle Bestandteile der untersuchten komplexen biologischen Interaktion hergestellt und charakterisiert, wir haben eine Struktur des Komplexes vorgeschlagen und die Eigenschaften der interagierenden Teile charakterisiert.

Statistics

Downloads

175 downloads since deposited on 08 Jan 2010
4 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation (monographical)
Referees:Zerbe Oliver, Robinson John
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
UZH Dissertations
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Place of Publication:Zürich
Date:2009
Deposited On:08 Jan 2010 13:35
Last Modified:15 Apr 2021 14:02
Number of Pages:182
OA Status:Green
Other Identification Number:urn:nbn:ch:bel-330641

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'Structure, folding and interactions of membrane-associated biomolecules studied by NMR'.
Preview
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 16MB