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Diagnosis and management of fistulizing Crohn's disease


Nielsen, O H; Rogler, G; Hahnloser, D; Thomsen, O Ø (2009). Diagnosis and management of fistulizing Crohn's disease. Nature Reviews. Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 6(2):92-106.

Abstract

The transmural inflammation characteristic of Crohn's disease predisposes patients to the formation of fistulas. Up to 50% of patients with Crohn's disease are affected by fistulas, which is a major problem given the considerable morbidity associated with this complication. Appropriate treatment of fistulas requires knowledge of specific pharmacological and surgical therapies. Treatment options depend on the severity of symptoms, fistula location, the number and complexity of fistula tracts, and the presence of rectal complications. Internal fistulas, such as ileoileal or ileocecal fistulas, are mostly asymptomatic and do not require intervention. By contrast, perianal fistulas can be painful and abscesses may develop that require surgical drainage with or without seton placement, transient ileostomy, or in severe cases, proctectomy. This Review describes the epidemiology and pathology of fistulizing Crohn's disease. Particular focus is given to external and perianal fistulas, for which treatment options are well established. Available therapeutic options, including novel therapies, are discussed. Wherever possible, practical and evidence-based treatment regimens for Crohn's disease-associated fistulas are provided.

Abstract

The transmural inflammation characteristic of Crohn's disease predisposes patients to the formation of fistulas. Up to 50% of patients with Crohn's disease are affected by fistulas, which is a major problem given the considerable morbidity associated with this complication. Appropriate treatment of fistulas requires knowledge of specific pharmacological and surgical therapies. Treatment options depend on the severity of symptoms, fistula location, the number and complexity of fistula tracts, and the presence of rectal complications. Internal fistulas, such as ileoileal or ileocecal fistulas, are mostly asymptomatic and do not require intervention. By contrast, perianal fistulas can be painful and abscesses may develop that require surgical drainage with or without seton placement, transient ileostomy, or in severe cases, proctectomy. This Review describes the epidemiology and pathology of fistulizing Crohn's disease. Particular focus is given to external and perianal fistulas, for which treatment options are well established. Available therapeutic options, including novel therapies, are discussed. Wherever possible, practical and evidence-based treatment regimens for Crohn's disease-associated fistulas are provided.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Hepatology, Gastroenterology, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:30 Jan 2010 17:43
Last Modified:17 Aug 2018 18:24
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:1759-5045
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/ncpgasthep1340
Official URL:http://www.nature.com/nrgastro/journal/v6/n2/pdf/ncpgasthep1340.pdf
Related URLs:http://www.nature.com/nrgastro/index.html (Publisher)
PubMed ID:19153563

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