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Determinants of vaccine immunity in the cohort of human immunodeficiency virus-infected children living in Switzerland


Myers, C; Posfay-Barbe, K M; Aebi, C; Cheseaux, J-J; Kind, C; Rudin, C; Nadal, D; Siegrist, C-A (2009). Determinants of vaccine immunity in the cohort of human immunodeficiency virus-infected children living in Switzerland. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 28(11):996-1001.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children are at increased risk of infections caused by vaccine preventable pathogens, and specific immunization recommendations have been issued. METHODS: A prospective national multicenter study assessed how these recommendations are followed in Switzerland and how immunization history correlates with vaccine immunity. RESULTS: Among 87 HIV-infected children (mean age: 11.1 years) followed in the 5 Swiss university hospitals and 1 regional hospital, most (76%) had CD4 T cells >25%, were receiving highly active antiretroviral treatment (79%) and had undetectable viral load (60%). Immunization coverage was lower than in the general population and many lacked serum antibodies to vaccine-preventable pathogens, including measles (54%), varicella (39%), and hepatitis B (65%). The presence of vaccine antibodies correlated most significantly with having an up-to-date immunization history (P<0.05). An up-to-date immunization history was not related to age, immunologic stage, or viremia but to the referral medical center. CONCLUSIONS: All pediatricians in charge of HIV-infected children are urged to identify missing immunizations in this high-risk population.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children are at increased risk of infections caused by vaccine preventable pathogens, and specific immunization recommendations have been issued. METHODS: A prospective national multicenter study assessed how these recommendations are followed in Switzerland and how immunization history correlates with vaccine immunity. RESULTS: Among 87 HIV-infected children (mean age: 11.1 years) followed in the 5 Swiss university hospitals and 1 regional hospital, most (76%) had CD4 T cells >25%, were receiving highly active antiretroviral treatment (79%) and had undetectable viral load (60%). Immunization coverage was lower than in the general population and many lacked serum antibodies to vaccine-preventable pathogens, including measles (54%), varicella (39%), and hepatitis B (65%). The presence of vaccine antibodies correlated most significantly with having an up-to-date immunization history (P<0.05). An up-to-date immunization history was not related to age, immunologic stage, or viremia but to the referral medical center. CONCLUSIONS: All pediatricians in charge of HIV-infected children are urged to identify missing immunizations in this high-risk population.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:11 Mar 2010 14:50
Last Modified:18 Feb 2018 00:11
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0891-3668
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0b013e3181a78348
PubMed ID:19820427

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