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Cognition in Rodents


Janus, C; Galsworthy, M J; Wolfer, D P; Welzl, H (2009). Cognition in Rodents. In: Kim, Y K. Handbook of Behavior genetics. New York: Springer Science, 159-174.

Abstract

Cognition is a loosely defined term with divergent meanings in different disciplines and species. In human psychology, ‘cognition’ is often used in reference to concepts such as ‘mind’ or ‘higher mental functions’. However, in more general terms, ‘cognition’ is regularly used to refer to all manner of information organization by the brain: from collection, to processing, to storage and recognition or recall. Whereas ‘cognition’ would seem to permeate all mental functions, including subjective perception and innate responses, ‘cognitive ability’ has a slightly more specific connotation – something more akin to intelligence or information-processing ability. Thus, ‘cognition’ deals with mental process structure and ‘cognitive abilities’ with natural variations impinging upon functioning at the higher end of that structure. Although the term ‘cognition’ sometimes subsumes or substitutes ‘cognitive ability’ in the literature, understanding this methodological distinction allows us to read across the two fields without the misunderstandings that classical cognitive psychologists have sometimes shown for cognitive ability research.

Abstract

Cognition is a loosely defined term with divergent meanings in different disciplines and species. In human psychology, ‘cognition’ is often used in reference to concepts such as ‘mind’ or ‘higher mental functions’. However, in more general terms, ‘cognition’ is regularly used to refer to all manner of information organization by the brain: from collection, to processing, to storage and recognition or recall. Whereas ‘cognition’ would seem to permeate all mental functions, including subjective perception and innate responses, ‘cognitive ability’ has a slightly more specific connotation – something more akin to intelligence or information-processing ability. Thus, ‘cognition’ deals with mental process structure and ‘cognitive abilities’ with natural variations impinging upon functioning at the higher end of that structure. Although the term ‘cognition’ sometimes subsumes or substitutes ‘cognitive ability’ in the literature, understanding this methodological distinction allows us to read across the two fields without the misunderstandings that classical cognitive psychologists have sometimes shown for cognitive ability research.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Medicine
Life Sciences > General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Date:2009
Deposited On:10 Feb 2010 12:54
Last Modified:14 Jul 2020 14:51
Publisher:Springer Science
Number:Part I
ISBN:978-0-387-76726-0 (Print), 387-76727-7 (Online)
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-76727-7_11
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&con_lng=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=005739110
Other Identification Number:Library of Congress Control Number: 2008941695

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