Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Nihon no seimei rinrigaku ni okeru hito no shintai


Steineck, Raji C (2010). Nihon no seimei rinrigaku ni okeru hito no shintai. In: Hosei Daigaku. Jintai to shintaisei. Tokyo: Hosei daigaku kokusai nihongaku senta, 191-205.

Abstract

Bioethics is a cultural discourse on the legitimate treatment of the human body; it is necessitated by the practical coincidence of two seemingly contradictory notions concerning this subject. In short, it is the existential body that posits the norm for treating the physical body - and both perspectives, while legitimized in the act, need to be continually balanced and negotiated. In spite of this constitutive double-entendre, a much more straightforward, materialist notion of the body seems to occupy most of the discursive terrain in Japanese bioethics. A minority of professional bioethicists in Japan employs a more comprehensive understanding of the problem. Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology has been particularly popular with bioethicists who attempt to grasp both the scientific and the existential side of such problems as brain death, the persistent vegetative state, or human cloning and human embryo research. However, theoretical elaboration so far did not translate into discursive success. When it comes to questions of life and death, contemporary Japan is largely dominated by the positivistic (materialistic) view of the human body.

Abstract

Bioethics is a cultural discourse on the legitimate treatment of the human body; it is necessitated by the practical coincidence of two seemingly contradictory notions concerning this subject. In short, it is the existential body that posits the norm for treating the physical body - and both perspectives, while legitimized in the act, need to be continually balanced and negotiated. In spite of this constitutive double-entendre, a much more straightforward, materialist notion of the body seems to occupy most of the discursive terrain in Japanese bioethics. A minority of professional bioethicists in Japan employs a more comprehensive understanding of the problem. Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology has been particularly popular with bioethicists who attempt to grasp both the scientific and the existential side of such problems as brain death, the persistent vegetative state, or human cloning and human embryo research. However, theoretical elaboration so far did not translate into discursive success. When it comes to questions of life and death, contemporary Japan is largely dominated by the positivistic (materialistic) view of the human body.

Statistics

Downloads

2213 downloads since deposited on 04 Nov 2010
251 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Other titles:The Human Body in Japanese Bioethics
Item Type:Book Section, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Asian and Oriental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:290 Other religions
180 Ancient, medieval & eastern philosophy
Language:Japanese
Date:2010
Deposited On:04 Nov 2010 13:35
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 17:21
Publisher:Hosei daigaku kokusai nihongaku senta
Series Name:Kokusai nihongaku kenkyu sosho
Number:13
OA Status:Green
Related URLs:http://aterui.i.hosei.ac.jp/Default.aspx?tabid=761

Download

Download PDF  'Nihon no seimei rinrigaku ni okeru hito no shintai'.
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 461kB
Get full-text in a library