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Astrophysical limitations to the identification of dark matter: Indirect neutrino signals vis-à-vis direct detection recoil rates


Serpico, P D; Bertone, G (2010). Astrophysical limitations to the identification of dark matter: Indirect neutrino signals vis-à-vis direct detection recoil rates. Physical Review D, 82(6):063505.

Abstract

A convincing identification of dark matter (DM) particles can probably be achieved only through a combined analysis of different detections strategies, which provides an effective way of removing degeneracies in the parameter space of DM models. In practice, however, this program is made complicated by the fact that different strategies depend on different physical quantities, or on the same quantities but in a different way, making the treatment of systematic errors rather tricky. We discuss here the uncertainties on the recoil rate in direct-detection experiments and on the muon rate induced by neutrinos from dark matter annihilations in the Sun, and we show that, contrarily to the local DM density or overall cross section scale, irreducible astrophysical uncertainties affect the two rates in a different fashion, therefore limiting our ability to reconstruct the parameters of the dark matter particles. By varying within their respective errors astrophysical parameters such as the escape velocity and the velocity dispersion of dark matter particles, we show that the uncertainty on the relative strength of the neutrino and direct-detection signal is as large as a factor of 2 for typical values of the parameters, but can be even larger in some circumstances.

Abstract

A convincing identification of dark matter (DM) particles can probably be achieved only through a combined analysis of different detections strategies, which provides an effective way of removing degeneracies in the parameter space of DM models. In practice, however, this program is made complicated by the fact that different strategies depend on different physical quantities, or on the same quantities but in a different way, making the treatment of systematic errors rather tricky. We discuss here the uncertainties on the recoil rate in direct-detection experiments and on the muon rate induced by neutrinos from dark matter annihilations in the Sun, and we show that, contrarily to the local DM density or overall cross section scale, irreducible astrophysical uncertainties affect the two rates in a different fashion, therefore limiting our ability to reconstruct the parameters of the dark matter particles. By varying within their respective errors astrophysical parameters such as the escape velocity and the velocity dispersion of dark matter particles, we show that the uncertainty on the relative strength of the neutrino and direct-detection signal is as large as a factor of 2 for typical values of the parameters, but can be even larger in some circumstances.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute for Computational Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Language:English
Date:September 2010
Deposited On:01 Mar 2011 08:36
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 17:55
Publisher:American Physical Society
ISSN:1550-2368
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.82.063505
Related URLs:http://arxiv.org/abs/1006.3268

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Download PDF  'Astrophysical limitations to the identification of dark matter: Indirect neutrino signals vis-à-vis direct detection recoil rates'.
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Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF (Accepted manuscript, Version 1)
Size: 311kB