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Prevalence of key resistance mutations K65R, K103N, and M184V as minority HIV-1 variants in chronically HIV-1 infected, treatment-naïve patients


Metzner, K J; Rauch, P; Braun, P; Knechten, H; Ehret, R; Korn, K; Kaiser, R; Sichtig, N; Ranneberg, B; van Lunzen, J; Walter, H (2011). Prevalence of key resistance mutations K65R, K103N, and M184V as minority HIV-1 variants in chronically HIV-1 infected, treatment-naïve patients. Journal of Clinical Virology, 50(2):156-161.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants, undetected by conventional genotyping, may impair the outcome of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thus, we retrospectively analyzed the prevalence of minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants before ART in chronically HIV-1 infected patients initiating first-line therapy and assessed the impact on clinical outcome in the prospective German Truvada cohort. STUDY DESIGN: Samples from 146 antiretroviral treatment-naïve patients were collected between April 2005 and August 2006. K65R, K103N, and M184V variants at low frequencies were detected by allele-specific real-time PCR. RESULTS: Minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants were detected in 20/146 patients (13.7%): the M184V mutation in 12/146 patients (8.2%), the K103N mutation in 8/146 patients (5.5%), and the K65R mutation in 4/146 patients (2.7%). Four patients with the M184V mutation also harbored the K65R or the K103N mutation. The 12- and 24 months virological efficacy data revealed that the rate of treatment failure was not increased in the group of patients harboring minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants prior to ART. CONCLUSIONS: Minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants can be frequently detected in treatment-naïve, chronically HIV-1 infected patients. Despite the presence of those mutations as minority variants before initiating ART, most of the patients were successfully treated.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants, undetected by conventional genotyping, may impair the outcome of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thus, we retrospectively analyzed the prevalence of minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants before ART in chronically HIV-1 infected patients initiating first-line therapy and assessed the impact on clinical outcome in the prospective German Truvada cohort. STUDY DESIGN: Samples from 146 antiretroviral treatment-naïve patients were collected between April 2005 and August 2006. K65R, K103N, and M184V variants at low frequencies were detected by allele-specific real-time PCR. RESULTS: Minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants were detected in 20/146 patients (13.7%): the M184V mutation in 12/146 patients (8.2%), the K103N mutation in 8/146 patients (5.5%), and the K65R mutation in 4/146 patients (2.7%). Four patients with the M184V mutation also harbored the K65R or the K103N mutation. The 12- and 24 months virological efficacy data revealed that the rate of treatment failure was not increased in the group of patients harboring minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants prior to ART. CONCLUSIONS: Minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants can be frequently detected in treatment-naïve, chronically HIV-1 infected patients. Despite the presence of those mutations as minority variants before initiating ART, most of the patients were successfully treated.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:16 Jan 2011 11:40
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 13:09
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1386-6532
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2010.10.001
PubMed ID:21056001

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