Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Increased sensitivity for the diagnosis of Taenia saginata cysticercus infection by additional heart examination compared to the EU-approved routine meat inspection


Eichenberger, R M; Stephan, Roger; Deplazes, P (2011). Increased sensitivity for the diagnosis of Taenia saginata cysticercus infection by additional heart examination compared to the EU-approved routine meat inspection. Food Control, 22(6):989-992.

Abstract

In spite of the statutory meat inspection at abattoirs, Taenia saginata cysticercus infection in cattle remains an economically important parasitic disease for the livestock industry by affecting food safety. The routinely performed standard meat inspection protocol has a low diagnostic sensitivity for the detection of T. saginata cysticerci infections. Therefore, an abattoir trial aiming to increase the detection level was undertaken. In three EU-approved abattoirs, several additional heart incisions were performed in a total of 1088 slaughtered cattle originating from 832 farms throughout Switzerland. Cysticerci as putative parasitic lesions were classified by visual examination during meat inspection and confirmed microscopically and/or by molecular analyses. With the EU-approved routine meat inspection, bovine cysticercosis was diagnosed in 1.8% (20/1088) of the slaughtered animals. Additional incisions into the heart muscle revealed a further 29 cases, indicating that the prevalence was at least 4.5%. All infected animals originated from individual farms. This straightforward technique had a significantly higher sensitivity and is feasible for routine practice. It also confirms that the prevalence of this zoonotic parasite in the cattle population is underestimated based on the routine abattoir reports.

Abstract

In spite of the statutory meat inspection at abattoirs, Taenia saginata cysticercus infection in cattle remains an economically important parasitic disease for the livestock industry by affecting food safety. The routinely performed standard meat inspection protocol has a low diagnostic sensitivity for the detection of T. saginata cysticerci infections. Therefore, an abattoir trial aiming to increase the detection level was undertaken. In three EU-approved abattoirs, several additional heart incisions were performed in a total of 1088 slaughtered cattle originating from 832 farms throughout Switzerland. Cysticerci as putative parasitic lesions were classified by visual examination during meat inspection and confirmed microscopically and/or by molecular analyses. With the EU-approved routine meat inspection, bovine cysticercosis was diagnosed in 1.8% (20/1088) of the slaughtered animals. Additional incisions into the heart muscle revealed a further 29 cases, indicating that the prevalence was at least 4.5%. All infected animals originated from individual farms. This straightforward technique had a significantly higher sensitivity and is feasible for routine practice. It also confirms that the prevalence of this zoonotic parasite in the cattle population is underestimated based on the routine abattoir reports.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
31 citations in Web of Science®
29 citations in Scopus®
23 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

3 downloads since deposited on 18 Feb 2011
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology

05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Food Safety and Hygiene
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
600 Technology
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Biotechnology
Life Sciences > Food Science
Uncontrolled Keywords:Taenia saginata, Cysticercus bovis, Bovine cysticercosis, Meat inspection, Diagnosis
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:18 Feb 2011 07:52
Last Modified:30 Jul 2020 00:30
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0956-7135
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodcont.2010.11.033

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members