Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Uptake and antileishmanial activity of meglumine antimoniate-containing liposomes in Leishmania (Leishmania) major-infected macrophages


Treiger Borema, S E; Schwendener, R A; Osso, J A; de Andrade, H F; Nascimento, N (2011). Uptake and antileishmanial activity of meglumine antimoniate-containing liposomes in Leishmania (Leishmania) major-infected macrophages. International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, 38(4):341-347.

Abstract

Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease caused by the intramacrophage protozoa Leishmania spp. and may be fatal if left untreated. Although pentavalent antimonials are toxic and their mechanism of action is unclear, they remain the first-line drugs for treatment of leishmaniasis. An effective therapy could be achieved by delivering antileishmanial drugs to the site of infection. Compared with free drugs, antileishmanial agent-containing liposomes are more effective, less toxic and have fewer adverse side effects. The aim of this study was to develop novel meglumine antimoniate (MA)-containing liposome formulations and to analyse their antileishmanial activity and uptake by macrophages. Determination of the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values showed that MA-containing liposomes were ≥10-fold more effective than the free drug, with a 5-fold increase in selectivity index, higher activity and reduced macrophage toxicity. The concentration required to kill 100% of intracellular amastigotes was ≥40-fold lower when MA was encapsulated in liposomes containing phosphatidylserine compared with the free drug. Fluorescence microscopy analysis revealed increased uptake of fluorescent liposomes in infected macrophages after short incubation times compared with non-infected macrophages. In conclusion, these data suggest that MA encapsulated in liposome formulations is more effective against Leishmania-infected macrophages than the non-liposomal drug. Development of liposome formulations is a valuable approach to the treatment of infectious diseases involving the mononuclear phagocyte system.

Abstract

Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease caused by the intramacrophage protozoa Leishmania spp. and may be fatal if left untreated. Although pentavalent antimonials are toxic and their mechanism of action is unclear, they remain the first-line drugs for treatment of leishmaniasis. An effective therapy could be achieved by delivering antileishmanial drugs to the site of infection. Compared with free drugs, antileishmanial agent-containing liposomes are more effective, less toxic and have fewer adverse side effects. The aim of this study was to develop novel meglumine antimoniate (MA)-containing liposome formulations and to analyse their antileishmanial activity and uptake by macrophages. Determination of the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values showed that MA-containing liposomes were ≥10-fold more effective than the free drug, with a 5-fold increase in selectivity index, higher activity and reduced macrophage toxicity. The concentration required to kill 100% of intracellular amastigotes was ≥40-fold lower when MA was encapsulated in liposomes containing phosphatidylserine compared with the free drug. Fluorescence microscopy analysis revealed increased uptake of fluorescent liposomes in infected macrophages after short incubation times compared with non-infected macrophages. In conclusion, these data suggest that MA encapsulated in liposome formulations is more effective against Leishmania-infected macrophages than the non-liposomal drug. Development of liposome formulations is a valuable approach to the treatment of infectious diseases involving the mononuclear phagocyte system.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
21 citations in Web of Science®
23 citations in Scopus®
19 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

4 downloads since deposited on 12 Oct 2011
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Cancer Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:12 Oct 2011 11:37
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 13:41
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0924-8579
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2011.05.012
PubMed ID:21783345

Download