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Concurrent TMS-fMRI and psychophysics reveal frontal influences on human retinotopic visual cortex


Ruff, Christian C; Blankenburg, F; Bjoertomt, O; Bestmann, S; Freeman, E; Haynes, J-D; Rees, G; Josephs, O; Deichmann, R; Driver, J (2006). Concurrent TMS-fMRI and psychophysics reveal frontal influences on human retinotopic visual cortex. Current Biology, 16(15):1479-1488.

Abstract

Our results provide causal evidence that circuits originating in the human FEF can modulate activity in retinotopic visual cortex, in a manner that differentiates the central and peripheral visual field, with functional consequences for perception. More generally, our study illustrates how the new approach of concurrent TMS-fMRI can now reveal causal interactions between remote but interconnected areas of the human brain.

Abstract

Our results provide causal evidence that circuits originating in the human FEF can modulate activity in retinotopic visual cortex, in a manner that differentiates the central and peripheral visual field, with functional consequences for perception. More generally, our study illustrates how the new approach of concurrent TMS-fMRI can now reveal causal interactions between remote but interconnected areas of the human brain.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
08 University Research Priority Programs > Foundations of Human Social Behavior: Altruism and Egoism
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
330 Economics
Language:English
Date:2006
Deposited On:26 Oct 2011 11:23
Last Modified:23 Sep 2018 05:21
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0960-9822
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2006.06.057
PubMed ID:16890523

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