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The Effects of Manipulation of Visual Feedback in Virtual Reality on Cortical Activity


Brand, J; Geisseler, O; Holper, L; Hepp-Reymond, M C; Morari, M; Kiper, D; Eng, K (2011). The Effects of Manipulation of Visual Feedback in Virtual Reality on Cortical Activity. In: 2011 International Conference on Virtual Rehabilitation (ICVR), Zurich, Switzerland, 27 June 2011 - 29 June 2011.

Abstract

It is known that systematic visual distortions using virtual reality technologies, prisms or mirrors, may have therapeutic effects for patients suffering from stroke or body image identity disorders. However, there are few studies which directly investigate neural activity changes during visual feedback manipulation. In the present study we created an experimental setup for investigating the effects of systematic virtual reality-mediated visual feedback manipulation of finger movements on cortical activity. We performed tests with two healthy female subjects who performed a line-tracking task under four conditions manipulating visual feedback of their own hand. To investigate hemodynamic responses in motor areas during the line tracking task we used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We predicted that viewing larger or smaller virtual movements of fingers, compared to the real movements, would affect activity in motor areas and thus the hemodynamic response. Our preliminary results showed changes in the hemodynamic responses between stimulation period and baseline. There were indications of possible differences between conditions, and also of adaptation effects within conditions. However these effects were not significant in our preliminary data and we therefore need to collect additional data to draw further conclusions.

Abstract

It is known that systematic visual distortions using virtual reality technologies, prisms or mirrors, may have therapeutic effects for patients suffering from stroke or body image identity disorders. However, there are few studies which directly investigate neural activity changes during visual feedback manipulation. In the present study we created an experimental setup for investigating the effects of systematic virtual reality-mediated visual feedback manipulation of finger movements on cortical activity. We performed tests with two healthy female subjects who performed a line-tracking task under four conditions manipulating visual feedback of their own hand. To investigate hemodynamic responses in motor areas during the line tracking task we used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We predicted that viewing larger or smaller virtual movements of fingers, compared to the real movements, would affect activity in motor areas and thus the hemodynamic response. Our preliminary results showed changes in the hemodynamic responses between stimulation period and baseline. There were indications of possible differences between conditions, and also of adaptation effects within conditions. However these effects were not significant in our preliminary data and we therefore need to collect additional data to draw further conclusions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Neuroinformatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Artificial Intelligence
Physical Sciences > Biomedical Engineering
Language:English
Event End Date:29 June 2011
Deposited On:07 Mar 2012 17:08
Last Modified:11 Mar 2020 23:17
Publisher:IEEE
Number of Pages:0
ISBN:978-1-61284-473-2;978-1-61284-475-6
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1109/ICVR.2011.5971815

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