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Chemotherapy before liver resection of colorectal metastases: friend or foe?


Lehmann, Kuno; Rickenbacher, Andreas; Weber, Achim; Pestalozzi, Bernhard C; Clavien, Pierre-Alain (2012). Chemotherapy before liver resection of colorectal metastases: friend or foe? Annals of Surgery, 255(2):237-247.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We conducted a systematic review of the published literature to critically assess benefits and risks of the use of preoperative chemotherapy in patients presenting with colorectal liver metastases.
BACKGROUND: In many centers, chemotherapy is used before hepatic resection of colorectal metastases, even in the presence of a single lesion. Application of chemotherapy requires clear conceptual distinction between patients presenting with resectable lesions (neoadjuvant) versus patients presenting with unresectable lesions, for which chemotherapy is used to reach a resectable situation (downsizing).
METHODS: The literature (PubMed) was systematically reviewed for publications related to liver surgery and chemotherapy according to the methodology recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration.
RESULTS: For unresectable liver metastases, combination regimens result in enhanced tumor response and resectability rates up to 30%, although the additional benefit from targeted agents such as bevacizumab or cetuximab is marginal. For resectable lesions, studies on neoadjuvant chemotherapy failed to convincingly demonstrate a survival benefit. Most reports described increased postoperative complications in a subset of patients due to parenchymal alterations such as chemotherapy-associated steatohepatitis or sinusoidal obstruction syndrome.
CONCLUSION: Preoperative standard chemotherapy can be recommended for downsizing unresectable liver metastases, but not for resectable lesions, for which adjuvant chemotherapy is preferred.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We conducted a systematic review of the published literature to critically assess benefits and risks of the use of preoperative chemotherapy in patients presenting with colorectal liver metastases.
BACKGROUND: In many centers, chemotherapy is used before hepatic resection of colorectal metastases, even in the presence of a single lesion. Application of chemotherapy requires clear conceptual distinction between patients presenting with resectable lesions (neoadjuvant) versus patients presenting with unresectable lesions, for which chemotherapy is used to reach a resectable situation (downsizing).
METHODS: The literature (PubMed) was systematically reviewed for publications related to liver surgery and chemotherapy according to the methodology recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration.
RESULTS: For unresectable liver metastases, combination regimens result in enhanced tumor response and resectability rates up to 30%, although the additional benefit from targeted agents such as bevacizumab or cetuximab is marginal. For resectable lesions, studies on neoadjuvant chemotherapy failed to convincingly demonstrate a survival benefit. Most reports described increased postoperative complications in a subset of patients due to parenchymal alterations such as chemotherapy-associated steatohepatitis or sinusoidal obstruction syndrome.
CONCLUSION: Preoperative standard chemotherapy can be recommended for downsizing unresectable liver metastases, but not for resectable lesions, for which adjuvant chemotherapy is preferred.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Pathology and Molecular Pathology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Oncology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:10 Jan 2013 12:12
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 00:30
Publisher:Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:0003-4932
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0b013e3182356236
PubMed ID:22041509

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