Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Agamben in the Ogaden: Violence and sovereignty in the Ethiopian–Somali frontier


Hagmann, Tobias; Korf, Benedikt (2012). Agamben in the Ogaden: Violence and sovereignty in the Ethiopian–Somali frontier. Political Geography, 31(4):205-214.

Abstract

This paper asks what makes the periphery or the frontier a prime locus of the “inclusionary exclusion” that is, according to Giorgio Agamben, so constitutive of the state of exception. By applying Agamben’s analytics to the Ogaden e a frontier province of the Ethiopian state e we propose an interpretation of the political history of the Ethiopian Ogaden as a recurrent government by exception that spans the Imperial rule (c. 1890e1974), the socialist dictatorship of the Derg (1974e1991), and the current revolutionary democratic regime led by the Ethiopian Peoples’ Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) (1991etoday). Drawing attention to the historical continuities in the exercise of (Ethiopian) state sovereignty in its (Somali) frontier, we offer a genealogy of the violent incorporation of the Ogaden into the Ethiopian body politic. We identify recurring practices of sovereign power by successive Ethiopian regimes that are constitutive of the state of exception, namely a conflation between law and lawlessness, the politics of bare life and an encampment strategy. By doing so, this paper insists on the constitutive importance of land appropriation e Carl Schmitt’s Landnahme e in performances of sovereignty and territorialization at the margins of the postcolonial state.

Abstract

This paper asks what makes the periphery or the frontier a prime locus of the “inclusionary exclusion” that is, according to Giorgio Agamben, so constitutive of the state of exception. By applying Agamben’s analytics to the Ogaden e a frontier province of the Ethiopian state e we propose an interpretation of the political history of the Ethiopian Ogaden as a recurrent government by exception that spans the Imperial rule (c. 1890e1974), the socialist dictatorship of the Derg (1974e1991), and the current revolutionary democratic regime led by the Ethiopian Peoples’ Revolutionary Democratic Front (EPRDF) (1991etoday). Drawing attention to the historical continuities in the exercise of (Ethiopian) state sovereignty in its (Somali) frontier, we offer a genealogy of the violent incorporation of the Ogaden into the Ethiopian body politic. We identify recurring practices of sovereign power by successive Ethiopian regimes that are constitutive of the state of exception, namely a conflation between law and lawlessness, the politics of bare life and an encampment strategy. By doing so, this paper insists on the constitutive importance of land appropriation e Carl Schmitt’s Landnahme e in performances of sovereignty and territorialization at the margins of the postcolonial state.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
22 citations in Web of Science®
32 citations in Scopus®
57 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

4 downloads since deposited on 26 Feb 2013
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
08 University Research Priority Programs > Asia and Europe
Dewey Decimal Classification:950 History of Asia
180 Ancient, medieval & eastern philosophy
910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:26 Feb 2013 15:31
Last Modified:17 Feb 2018 01:24
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0962-6298
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.polgeo.2011.12.004

Download