Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The emergence of echinococcosis in central Asia


Torgerson, Paul R (2013). The emergence of echinococcosis in central Asia. Parasitology, 140(13):1667-1673.

Abstract

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, there was an increase in the number of cases of human echinococcosis recorded throughout central Asia. Between 1991 and 2001 incidence rates of cystic echinococcosis (CE) increased by 4 fold or more. There also appeared to be increases in prevalence of CE in livestock and prevalences of Echinococcus granulosus reported in dogs. The increase in human echinococcosis was associated with changes in livestock husbandry, decline in veterinary public health services, increases in dog populations and increased poverty, all of which served to promote transmission of E. granulosus. A few years after reports of increased transmission of E. granulosus, the first reports of E. multilocularis infection in dogs were recorded. Further studies indicated that in both Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan prevalences of up to 18% were present. Recently there has been a dramatic increase in the number of cases of human alveolar echinococcosis recorded in Kyrgyzstan with over 60 cases reported in 2011.

Abstract

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, there was an increase in the number of cases of human echinococcosis recorded throughout central Asia. Between 1991 and 2001 incidence rates of cystic echinococcosis (CE) increased by 4 fold or more. There also appeared to be increases in prevalence of CE in livestock and prevalences of Echinococcus granulosus reported in dogs. The increase in human echinococcosis was associated with changes in livestock husbandry, decline in veterinary public health services, increases in dog populations and increased poverty, all of which served to promote transmission of E. granulosus. A few years after reports of increased transmission of E. granulosus, the first reports of E. multilocularis infection in dogs were recorded. Further studies indicated that in both Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan prevalences of up to 18% were present. Recently there has been a dramatic increase in the number of cases of human alveolar echinococcosis recorded in Kyrgyzstan with over 60 cases reported in 2011.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
19 citations in Web of Science®
21 citations in Scopus®
24 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

107 downloads since deposited on 30 May 2013
32 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:30 May 2013 13:23
Last Modified:27 Jul 2018 16:13
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0031-1820
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1017/S0031182013000516
PubMed ID:23659353

Download

Download PDF  'The emergence of echinococcosis in central Asia'.
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 189kB
View at publisher
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF (Nationallizenz 142-005) - Registered users only until 1 November 2018
Size: 137kB
Embargo till: 2018-11-01
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF (Nationallizenz 142-005) - Registered users only until 1 November 2018
Size: 137kB
Embargo till: 2018-11-01