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Animal minds: philosophical and scientific aspects


Glock, Hans Johann (2013). Animal minds: philosophical and scientific aspects. In: Racine, Timothy P; Slaney, Kathleen L. A Wittgensteinian Perspective on the Use of Conceptual Analysis in Psychology. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 130-152.

Abstract

This essay discusses the relation between philosophical and scientific aspects of the topic of animal mentality. It defends the method of conceptual analysis both in general and with respect to the topic of animal minds (Sections 6.1–6.4). But it also argues for a type of conceptual analysis that is non-reductive and impure (Sections 6.5–6.6). This approach distinguishes the conceptual issues of philosophy from the factual issues of science, while being sensitive to the way in which these interact in specific questions, arguments, theories and research programmes. Philosophy is distinct from science, yet the two cannot proceed in isolation with respect to topics like that of animal minds, which pose both scientific and philosophical problems. A more specific reason for favouring impure conceptual analysis in the philosophy of psychology, but especially with respect to animal minds, is the importance of methodological issues which are neither straight-forwardly conceptual nor straightforwardly factual (Sections 6.7–6.8). Section 6.9 dwells on the connection between the proper analysis of mental concepts and our practice of applying many of them to animals.

Abstract

This essay discusses the relation between philosophical and scientific aspects of the topic of animal mentality. It defends the method of conceptual analysis both in general and with respect to the topic of animal minds (Sections 6.1–6.4). But it also argues for a type of conceptual analysis that is non-reductive and impure (Sections 6.5–6.6). This approach distinguishes the conceptual issues of philosophy from the factual issues of science, while being sensitive to the way in which these interact in specific questions, arguments, theories and research programmes. Philosophy is distinct from science, yet the two cannot proceed in isolation with respect to topics like that of animal minds, which pose both scientific and philosophical problems. A more specific reason for favouring impure conceptual analysis in the philosophy of psychology, but especially with respect to animal minds, is the importance of methodological issues which are neither straight-forwardly conceptual nor straightforwardly factual (Sections 6.7–6.8). Section 6.9 dwells on the connection between the proper analysis of mental concepts and our practice of applying many of them to animals.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Philosophy
Dewey Decimal Classification:100 Philosophy
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > General Psychology
Social Sciences & Humanities > General Arts and Humanities
Language:German
Date:2013
Deposited On:10 Jan 2014 10:12
Last Modified:30 Apr 2024 03:36
Publisher:Palgrave
ISBN:978-0-230-36915-3
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137384287_8