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Hemi-hamate autograft arthroplasty for acute and chronic PIP joint fracture dislocations


Lindenblatt, N; Biraima, A; Tami, I; Giovanoli, P; Calcagni, M (2013). Hemi-hamate autograft arthroplasty for acute and chronic PIP joint fracture dislocations. Handchirurgie, Mikrochirurgie, Plastische Chirurgie, 45(1):13-19.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Treatment of fracture dislocations of the PIP joint represents a hand surgical challenge. In hemi-hamate arthroplasty, the palmar joint surface is reconstructed using an osteochondral graft from the hamate and the immediate stability permits early movement.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed hemi-hamate reconstructions in 10 patients (mean age 34.9 years), who sustained fractures of the base of the middle phalanx of ≥50% surface and dorsal PIP dislocations. Outcomes were assessed by clinical exam and X-ray. Evaluation criteria were range of motion of PIP and DIP joints, grip strength, joint alignment, complications and donor site morbidity. Mean follow-up was 8.6 months (range 3-14). Fractures mostly involved the 4th and 5th fingers, all patients were male. Indications were subluxation and comminuition in acute cases of <6 weeks (5 patients) and chronic pain and morning stiffness in chronic cases (5 patients).
RESULTS: Operative treatment was performed in average after 93 days (range 0-371 days) after injury. Average PIP motion was 71° (range 0-90); DIP motion was 54° (range 10-90) with a mean PIP flexion contracture of 6.5° (range 0-20). Grip strength averaged 95% of the opposite hand. 4 patients had revision surgery (2× arthrolysis PIP joint, 2× screw shortening, 1× neurolysis R. dorsalis N. ulnaris).
CONCLUSIONS: Hemi-hamate autograft arthroplasty represents an effective procedure to address severe PIP joint fracture dislocations. It restores the comminuted articular surface in chronic injuries and in the acute injury it is a challenging but valuable alternative to extension block splinting. However, donor site morbidity and revision surgery have to be taken into account.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Treatment of fracture dislocations of the PIP joint represents a hand surgical challenge. In hemi-hamate arthroplasty, the palmar joint surface is reconstructed using an osteochondral graft from the hamate and the immediate stability permits early movement.
MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed hemi-hamate reconstructions in 10 patients (mean age 34.9 years), who sustained fractures of the base of the middle phalanx of ≥50% surface and dorsal PIP dislocations. Outcomes were assessed by clinical exam and X-ray. Evaluation criteria were range of motion of PIP and DIP joints, grip strength, joint alignment, complications and donor site morbidity. Mean follow-up was 8.6 months (range 3-14). Fractures mostly involved the 4th and 5th fingers, all patients were male. Indications were subluxation and comminuition in acute cases of <6 weeks (5 patients) and chronic pain and morning stiffness in chronic cases (5 patients).
RESULTS: Operative treatment was performed in average after 93 days (range 0-371 days) after injury. Average PIP motion was 71° (range 0-90); DIP motion was 54° (range 10-90) with a mean PIP flexion contracture of 6.5° (range 0-20). Grip strength averaged 95% of the opposite hand. 4 patients had revision surgery (2× arthrolysis PIP joint, 2× screw shortening, 1× neurolysis R. dorsalis N. ulnaris).
CONCLUSIONS: Hemi-hamate autograft arthroplasty represents an effective procedure to address severe PIP joint fracture dislocations. It restores the comminuted articular surface in chronic injuries and in the acute injury it is a challenging but valuable alternative to extension block splinting. However, donor site morbidity and revision surgery have to be taken into account.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2013
Deposited On:20 Jan 2014 10:12
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 19:56
Publisher:Thieme
ISSN:0722-1819
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0033-1337917
PubMed ID:23519711

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