Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Mediatization as a challenge: media logic versus political logic


Esser, Frank (2013). Mediatization as a challenge: media logic versus political logic. In: Kriesi, Hanspeter; Lavanex, Sandra; Esser, Frank; Matthes, Jörg; Bühlmann, Marc; Bochsler, Daniel. Democracy in the age of globalization and mediatization. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 155-176.

Abstract

Political communication is a precondition of democracy, and democracy depends heavily on the infrastructure of the media system. The media and mediated communication are of central relevance for contemporary societies due to their decisive influence on, and consequences for, political institutions, political actors, and individual citizens. Political actors have learnt to accept that their behavior to a significant extent is influenced by the rules of the game set by the mass media. This transformation has been described as a shift to audience democracy (Manin 1995) or media democracy (Jarren 2008a). The idea of media democracy is an extension of the model of representative democracy. It refers to a development that at its beginning aimed to make politics more inclusive and transparent. In the process policy-makers have become accountable to an ever growing volume of interests and demands from the public - not only in the context of elections but in many phases of the policy process. The pressure on policy-makers to be responsive to public opinion in general and special interests in particular has increased the role of the mass media in many ways. Politicians have grown to rely on the mass media for gauging public opinion (using media coverage as a proxy for public sentiments), and for generating attention, acceptance, and legitimation of their actions (using media channels for public presentation of politics).

Abstract

Political communication is a precondition of democracy, and democracy depends heavily on the infrastructure of the media system. The media and mediated communication are of central relevance for contemporary societies due to their decisive influence on, and consequences for, political institutions, political actors, and individual citizens. Political actors have learnt to accept that their behavior to a significant extent is influenced by the rules of the game set by the mass media. This transformation has been described as a shift to audience democracy (Manin 1995) or media democracy (Jarren 2008a). The idea of media democracy is an extension of the model of representative democracy. It refers to a development that at its beginning aimed to make politics more inclusive and transparent. In the process policy-makers have become accountable to an ever growing volume of interests and demands from the public - not only in the context of elections but in many phases of the policy process. The pressure on policy-makers to be responsive to public opinion in general and special interests in particular has increased the role of the mass media in many ways. Politicians have grown to rely on the mass media for gauging public opinion (using media coverage as a proxy for public sentiments), and for generating attention, acceptance, and legitimation of their actions (using media channels for public presentation of politics).

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

1489 downloads since deposited on 07 Feb 2014
481 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Department of Communication and Media Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:700 Arts
Uncontrolled Keywords:Mass Medium, Public Sphere, News Medium, Political Communication, Representative Democracy
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:07 Feb 2014 11:55
Last Modified:27 May 2020 11:37
Publisher:Palgrave
ISBN:978-1-137-29986-4
OA Status:Closed
Related URLs:https://www.recherche-portal.ch/permalink/f/1h21i27/ebi01_prod007586168 (Library Catalogue)
https://www.recherche-portal.ch/permalink/f/1h21i27/ebi01_prod009895234 (Library Catalogue)

Download

Closed Access: Download allowed only for UZH members

Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 4MB
Get full-text in a library