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Physiological mechanisms behind Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery


Lutz, Thomas A; Bueter, M (2014). Physiological mechanisms behind Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Digestive Surgery, 31(1):13-24.

Abstract

Obesity and its related comorbidities can be detrimental for the affected individual and challenge public health systems worldwide. Currently, the only available treatment options leading to clinically significant and maintained body weight loss and reduction in obesity-related morbidity and mortality are based on surgical interventions. Apart from the 'gold standard' Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), the vertical sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding are two frequently performed procedures. This review will discuss animal experiments designed to understand the underlying mechanisms of body weight loss after bariatric surgery. While caloric malabsorption and mechanical restriction are no major factors in this respect, alterations in gut hormone levels are invariably found after RYGB. However, their causal role in RYGB effects on eating and body weight has recently been challenged. Other potential factors contributing to the RYGB effects include increased bile acid concentrations and an altered composition of gut microbiota. RYGB is further associated with remarkable changes in the preference for different dietary components such as a decrease in the preference for high fat or sugar; it is important to note that the contribution of altered food preferences to the RYGB effects on body weight is not clear.

Abstract

Obesity and its related comorbidities can be detrimental for the affected individual and challenge public health systems worldwide. Currently, the only available treatment options leading to clinically significant and maintained body weight loss and reduction in obesity-related morbidity and mortality are based on surgical interventions. Apart from the 'gold standard' Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), the vertical sleeve gastrectomy and gastric banding are two frequently performed procedures. This review will discuss animal experiments designed to understand the underlying mechanisms of body weight loss after bariatric surgery. While caloric malabsorption and mechanical restriction are no major factors in this respect, alterations in gut hormone levels are invariably found after RYGB. However, their causal role in RYGB effects on eating and body weight has recently been challenged. Other potential factors contributing to the RYGB effects include increased bile acid concentrations and an altered composition of gut microbiota. RYGB is further associated with remarkable changes in the preference for different dietary components such as a decrease in the preference for high fat or sugar; it is important to note that the contribution of altered food preferences to the RYGB effects on body weight is not clear.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Physiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Surgery
Health Sciences > Gastroenterology
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:26 Mar 2014 15:18
Last Modified:12 Jan 2022 15:03
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:0253-4886
Additional Information:© 2013 S. Karger AG
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000354319
PubMed ID:24819493

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