Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Physical workload, trapezius muscle activity, and neck pain in nurses' night and day shifts: a physiological evaluation


Nicoletti, Corinne; Spengler, Christina M; Läubli, Thomas (2014). Physical workload, trapezius muscle activity, and neck pain in nurses' night and day shifts: a physiological evaluation. Applied Ergonomics, 45(3):741-746.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare physical workload, electromyography (EMG) of the trapezius muscle, neck pain and mental well-being at work between night and day shifts in twenty Swiss nurses. Work pulse (average increase of heart rate over resting heart rate) was lower during night (27 bpm) compared to day shifts (34 bpm; p < 0.01). Relative arm acceleration also indicated less physical activity during night (82% of average) compared to day shifts (110%; p < 0.01). Rest periods were significantly longer during night shifts. Trapezius muscle rest time was longer during night (13% of shift duration) than day shifts (7%; p < 0.01) and the 50th percentile of EMG activity was smaller (p = 0.02), indicating more opportunities for muscle relaxation during night shifts. Neck pain and mental well-being at work were similar between shifts. Subjective perception of burden was similar between shifts despite less physical burden at night, suggesting there are other contributing factors.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare physical workload, electromyography (EMG) of the trapezius muscle, neck pain and mental well-being at work between night and day shifts in twenty Swiss nurses. Work pulse (average increase of heart rate over resting heart rate) was lower during night (27 bpm) compared to day shifts (34 bpm; p < 0.01). Relative arm acceleration also indicated less physical activity during night (82% of average) compared to day shifts (110%; p < 0.01). Rest periods were significantly longer during night shifts. Trapezius muscle rest time was longer during night (13% of shift duration) than day shifts (7%; p < 0.01) and the 50th percentile of EMG activity was smaller (p = 0.02), indicating more opportunities for muscle relaxation during night shifts. Neck pain and mental well-being at work were similar between shifts. Subjective perception of burden was similar between shifts despite less physical burden at night, suggesting there are other contributing factors.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
9 citations in Web of Science®
12 citations in Scopus®
11 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 16 Apr 2014
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:German
Date:2014
Deposited On:16 Apr 2014 13:14
Last Modified:14 Feb 2018 21:12
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0003-6870
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apergo.2013.09.016
PubMed ID:24140243

Download