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Myc and Max homologs in Drosophila.


Gallant, P; Shiio, Y; Cheng, P F; Parkhurst, S M; Eisenman, R N (1996). Myc and Max homologs in Drosophila. Science, 274(5292):1523-1527.

Abstract

The proteins encoded by the myc proto-oncogene family are involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and neoplasia. Myc acts through dimerization with Max to bind DNA and activate transcription. Homologs of the myc and max genes were cloned from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and their protein products (dMyc and dMax) were shown to heterodimerize, recognize the same DNA sequence as their vertebrate homologs, and activate transcription. The dMyc protein is likely encoded by the Drosophila gene diminutive (dm), a mutation in which results in small body size and female sterility caused by degeneration of the ovaries. These findings indicate a potential role for Myc in germ cell development and set the stage for genetic analysis of Myc and Max.

The proteins encoded by the myc proto-oncogene family are involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and neoplasia. Myc acts through dimerization with Max to bind DNA and activate transcription. Homologs of the myc and max genes were cloned from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and their protein products (dMyc and dMax) were shown to heterodimerize, recognize the same DNA sequence as their vertebrate homologs, and activate transcription. The dMyc protein is likely encoded by the Drosophila gene diminutive (dm), a mutation in which results in small body size and female sterility caused by degeneration of the ovaries. These findings indicate a potential role for Myc in germ cell development and set the stage for genetic analysis of Myc and Max.

Citations

122 citations in Web of Science®
128 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Zoology (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:29 November 1996
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:15
Publisher:American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
ISSN:0036-8075
Publisher DOI:10.1126/science.274.5292.1523
PubMed ID:8929412

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