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Chapter 9: Pragmatics and Discourse


Jucker, Andreas H (2017). Chapter 9: Pragmatics and Discourse. In: Brinton, Laurel J; Bergs, Alexaner. The History of English/Historical Outlines from Sound to Text. Berlin: De Gruyter, 165-184.

Abstract

Pragmatics studies the processes of language use, while discourse analysis is devoted to its product, i.e. discourse. Pragmatics can be understood in a narrow sense focussing on cognitive-inferential aspects of information processing, and it can be understood in a wider sense in which it also includes social aspects of interaction. In historical pragmatics, the former conceptualization lies behind work on pragmatic explanations in language change, while the latter conceptualization studies earlier language use from a social and interactional perspective, including such aspects as inserts (e.g. interjections and discourse markers), speech acts, and terms of address. Discourse, as the product of language use, can be seen as a stretch of conversation (dialogue) or as a domain of communication. In the former conceptualization, research focuses on the structural properties of the dialogue, and in the latter, it deals with the linguistic practices pertaining to particular fields of knowledge or interaction, e.g. courtroom discourse, the discourse of science, and news discourse.

Abstract

Pragmatics studies the processes of language use, while discourse analysis is devoted to its product, i.e. discourse. Pragmatics can be understood in a narrow sense focussing on cognitive-inferential aspects of information processing, and it can be understood in a wider sense in which it also includes social aspects of interaction. In historical pragmatics, the former conceptualization lies behind work on pragmatic explanations in language change, while the latter conceptualization studies earlier language use from a social and interactional perspective, including such aspects as inserts (e.g. interjections and discourse markers), speech acts, and terms of address. Discourse, as the product of language use, can be seen as a stretch of conversation (dialogue) or as a domain of communication. In the former conceptualization, research focuses on the structural properties of the dialogue, and in the latter, it deals with the linguistic practices pertaining to particular fields of knowledge or interaction, e.g. courtroom discourse, the discourse of science, and news discourse.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > English Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:820 English & Old English literatures
Language:English
Date:2017
Deposited On:18 Oct 2017 13:34
Last Modified:19 Mar 2018 08:49
Publisher:De Gruyter
Number:1
ISBN:978-3-11-052238-9
Additional Information:Reprint of Jucker, Andreas H. (2012) Linguistic levels: Pragmatics and discourse. In: Alexander Bergs and Laurel Brinton (eds.). Historical Linguistics of English. (Handbooks of Linguistics and Communication Science 34.1). Berlin: de Gruyter, 197-212.
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Official URL. An embargo period may apply.
Official URL:https://www.degruyter.com/viewbooktoc/product/481140?rskey=lUOvcQ&onlyResultQuery=9783110522389

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