Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Design Recommendations for Self-Monitoring in the Workplace: Studies in Software Development


Meyer, André; Murphy, Gail C; Zimmermann, Thomas; Fritz, Thomas (2017). Design Recommendations for Self-Monitoring in the Workplace: Studies in Software Development. PACM on Human-Computer Interaction, 1(CSCW):1-24.

Abstract

One way to improve the productivity of knowledge workers is to increase their self-awareness about productivity at work through self-monitoring. Yet, little is known about expectations of, the experience with, and the impact of self-monitoring in the workplace. To address this gap, we studied software developers, as one community of knowledge workers. We used an iterative, user-feedback-driven development approach (N=20) and a survey (N=413) to infer design elements for workplace self-monitoring, which we then implemented as a technology probe called WorkAnalytics. We field-tested these design elements during a three-week study with software development professionals (N=43). Based on the results of the field study, we present design recommendations for self-monitoring in the workplace, such as using experience sampling to increase the awareness about work and to create richer insights, the need for a large variety of different metrics to retrospect about work, and that actionable insights, enriched with benchmarking data from co-workers, are likely needed to foster productive behavior change and improve collaboration at work. Our work can serve as a starting point for researchers and practitioners to build self-monitoring tools for the workplace.

Abstract

One way to improve the productivity of knowledge workers is to increase their self-awareness about productivity at work through self-monitoring. Yet, little is known about expectations of, the experience with, and the impact of self-monitoring in the workplace. To address this gap, we studied software developers, as one community of knowledge workers. We used an iterative, user-feedback-driven development approach (N=20) and a survey (N=413) to infer design elements for workplace self-monitoring, which we then implemented as a technology probe called WorkAnalytics. We field-tested these design elements during a three-week study with software development professionals (N=43). Based on the results of the field study, we present design recommendations for self-monitoring in the workplace, such as using experience sampling to increase the awareness about work and to create richer insights, the need for a large variety of different metrics to retrospect about work, and that actionable insights, enriched with benchmarking data from co-workers, are likely needed to foster productive behavior change and improve collaboration at work. Our work can serve as a starting point for researchers and practitioners to build self-monitoring tools for the workplace.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics

Altmetrics

Downloads

107 downloads since deposited on 19 Dec 2017
103 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Date:November 2017
Deposited On:19 Dec 2017 13:58
Last Modified:03 Jan 2019 07:34
Publisher:Association for Computing Machinery
ISSN:2573-0142
Additional Information:Arbeitstitel : Retrospecting on Work and Productivity A Study on Self-Monitoring Software Developers' Work
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1145/3134714
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:15499
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID200021_156997
  • : Project TitleDevelopers' Perception and Retrospection of Productivity

Download

Download PDF  'Design Recommendations for Self-Monitoring in the Workplace: Studies in Software Development'.
Preview
Content: Updated Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 3MB
View at publisher