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Acute aortic dissection: pathogenesis, risk factors and diagnosis


Gawinecka, Joanna; Schönrath, Felix; von Eckardstein, Arnold (2017). Acute aortic dissection: pathogenesis, risk factors and diagnosis. Swiss Medical Weekly, 147:w14489.

Abstract

Acute aortic dissection is a rare but life-threatening condition with a lethality rate of 1 to 2% per hour after onset of symptoms in untreated patients. Therefore, its prompt and proper diagnosis is vital to increase a patient's chance of survival and to prevent grievous complications. Typical symptoms of acute aortic dissection include severe chest pain, hypotension or syncope and, hence, mimic acute myocardial infarction or pulmonary embolism. Advanced age, male gender, long-term history of arterial hypertension and the presence of aortic aneurysm confer the greatest population attributable risk. However, patients with genetic connective tissue disorders such as Marfan, Loeys Dietz or Ehlers Danlos syndrome, and patients with bicuspid aortic valves are at the increased risk of aortic dissection at a much younger age. Imaging provides a robust foundation for diagnosing acute aortic dissection, as well as for monitoring of patients at increased risk of aortic disease. As yet, easily accessible blood tests play only a small role but have the potential to make diagnosis and monitoring of patients simpler and more cost-effective.

Abstract

Acute aortic dissection is a rare but life-threatening condition with a lethality rate of 1 to 2% per hour after onset of symptoms in untreated patients. Therefore, its prompt and proper diagnosis is vital to increase a patient's chance of survival and to prevent grievous complications. Typical symptoms of acute aortic dissection include severe chest pain, hypotension or syncope and, hence, mimic acute myocardial infarction or pulmonary embolism. Advanced age, male gender, long-term history of arterial hypertension and the presence of aortic aneurysm confer the greatest population attributable risk. However, patients with genetic connective tissue disorders such as Marfan, Loeys Dietz or Ehlers Danlos syndrome, and patients with bicuspid aortic valves are at the increased risk of aortic dissection at a much younger age. Imaging provides a robust foundation for diagnosing acute aortic dissection, as well as for monitoring of patients at increased risk of aortic disease. As yet, easily accessible blood tests play only a small role but have the potential to make diagnosis and monitoring of patients simpler and more cost-effective.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:5 September 2017
Deposited On:26 Feb 2018 15:35
Last Modified:14 Mar 2018 17:54
Publisher:EMH Swiss Medical Publishers
ISSN:0036-7672
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4414/smw.2017.14489
PubMed ID:28871571

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