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The Relationship of Lifestyle to International Trends in CHD


Epstein, F H (1989). The Relationship of Lifestyle to International Trends in CHD. International Journal of Epidemiology, 18(Supp.):S203-S209.

Abstract

Three components of lifestyle—nutrition, smoking and alcohol drinking patterns—have been related to rates of decline or increase of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in 27 countries during the past 10 to 25 years. In almost all of the countries with major falls or rises in CHD mortality, there are, respectively, corresponding decreases or increases in animal fat consumption, with reciprocal changes in the consumption of vegetable fats. Countries with moderate or small mortality declines show variable patterns of fat consumption. The prevalence of smoking is declining among men and remains unchanged or is increasing slightly among women in most countries, suggesting that differences in the rate of decline between countries or between the sexes are not related to an appreciable degree to differences in the change of smoking habits; however, the mortality changes in any individual country are most probably influenced by smoking. The consumption of alcoholic beverages increases almost everywhere and cannot be related quantitatively to the secular CHD mortality trends. These findings support in general the presently recommended courses of action for the prevention of premature CHD

Abstract

Three components of lifestyle—nutrition, smoking and alcohol drinking patterns—have been related to rates of decline or increase of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in 27 countries during the past 10 to 25 years. In almost all of the countries with major falls or rises in CHD mortality, there are, respectively, corresponding decreases or increases in animal fat consumption, with reciprocal changes in the consumption of vegetable fats. Countries with moderate or small mortality declines show variable patterns of fat consumption. The prevalence of smoking is declining among men and remains unchanged or is increasing slightly among women in most countries, suggesting that differences in the rate of decline between countries or between the sexes are not related to an appreciable degree to differences in the change of smoking habits; however, the mortality changes in any individual country are most probably influenced by smoking. The consumption of alcoholic beverages increases almost everywhere and cannot be related quantitatively to the secular CHD mortality trends. These findings support in general the presently recommended courses of action for the prevention of premature CHD

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:National licences > 142-005
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Epidemiology
Language:English
Date:1 January 1989
Deposited On:17 Oct 2018 14:39
Last Modified:15 Apr 2021 14:50
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0300-5771
OA Status:Green
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/18.supplement_1.s203

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