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In vivo imaging with a water immersion objective affects brain temperature, blood flow and oxygenation


Roche, Morgane; Chaigneau, Emmanuelle; Rungta, Ravi L; Boido, Davide; Weber, Bruno; Charpak, Serge (2019). In vivo imaging with a water immersion objective affects brain temperature, blood flow and oxygenation. eLife, 8:1-12.

Abstract

Previously, we reported the first oxygen partial pressure (Po2) measurements in the brain of awake mice, by performing two-photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy at micrometer resolution (Lyons et al., 2016). However, this study disregarded that imaging through a cranial window lowers brain temperature, an effect capable of affecting cerebral blood flow, the properties of the oxygen sensors and thus Po2 measurements. Here, we show that in awake mice chronically implanted with a glass window over a craniotomy or a thinned-skull surface, the postsurgical decrease of brain temperature recovers within a few days. However, upon imaging with a water immersion objective at room temperature, brain temperature decreases by ~2–3°C, causing drops in resting capillary blood flow, capillary Po2, hemoglobin saturation, and tissue Po2. These adverse effects are corrected by heating the immersion objective or avoided by imaging through a dry air objective, thereby revealing the physiological values of brain oxygenation.

Abstract

Previously, we reported the first oxygen partial pressure (Po2) measurements in the brain of awake mice, by performing two-photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy at micrometer resolution (Lyons et al., 2016). However, this study disregarded that imaging through a cranial window lowers brain temperature, an effect capable of affecting cerebral blood flow, the properties of the oxygen sensors and thus Po2 measurements. Here, we show that in awake mice chronically implanted with a glass window over a craniotomy or a thinned-skull surface, the postsurgical decrease of brain temperature recovers within a few days. However, upon imaging with a water immersion objective at room temperature, brain temperature decreases by ~2–3°C, causing drops in resting capillary blood flow, capillary Po2, hemoglobin saturation, and tissue Po2. These adverse effects are corrected by heating the immersion objective or avoided by imaging through a dry air objective, thereby revealing the physiological values of brain oxygenation.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > General Neuroscience
Life Sciences > General Immunology and Microbiology
Life Sciences > General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Uncontrolled Keywords:General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Immunology and Microbiology, General Neuroscience, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:9 August 2019
Deposited On:08 Jan 2020 10:59
Last Modified:22 Apr 2020 21:42
Publisher:eLife Sciences Publications Ltd.
ISSN:2050-084X
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.7554/elife.47324
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID310030_182703
  • : Project TitleBrain pericytes - Understanding basic physiology of intra- and intercellular signaling.

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