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Response of routine inflammatory biomarkers and novel Pancreatic Stone Protein to inhalation injury and its interference with sepsis detection in severely burned patients


Klein, Holger J; Rittirsch, Daniel; Buehler, Philipp K; Schweizer, Riccardo; Giovanoli, Pietro; Cinelli, Paolo; Plock, Jan A; Reding, Theresia; Graf, Rolf (2021). Response of routine inflammatory biomarkers and novel Pancreatic Stone Protein to inhalation injury and its interference with sepsis detection in severely burned patients. Burns, 47(2):338-348.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Inhalation of thermal and chemical products of combustion evokes an immune response measurable at a systemic level. Inhalation injury related kinetics of currently available inflammatory biomarkers and novel Pancreatic Stone Protein (PSP) as well as their interference with septic events has not been addressed to literature yet.

METHODS

Analysis of the influence of inhalation injury and ARDS on biomarker kinetics (PSP, procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive Protein (CRP), white blood cells (WBC)) in 90 patients admitted to Zurich Burn Center between May 2015 and October 2018 with burns ≥15% total body surface area (TBSA) over 14 days.

RESULTS

Twenty-five (27%) of 90 included patients presented with inhalation injury (median age 52 years [IQR 27], median TBSA 31.5% [IQR 21], mean ABSI-Score 7±3). At admission, only WBC demonstrated significantly higher values in the inhalation injury group (p=0.011). Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was present in 32% without association to the severity of inhalation injury (p=0.11). WBC, CRP and PCT failed to delineate inhalation injury related inflammation from septic progression at most time points. PSP was the strongest marker to identify septic patients both by its higher values and steeper increase over time (p<0.001).

CONCLUSION

Inhalation injury leads to an inflammatory response at a systemic level with alterations of biomarkers. While routine inflammatory markers demonstrated strong interferences between inhalation injury with its associated ARDS and evolving sepsis, PSP reliably identified septic patients in a setting of inflammatory turbulences secondary to inhalation injury.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Inhalation of thermal and chemical products of combustion evokes an immune response measurable at a systemic level. Inhalation injury related kinetics of currently available inflammatory biomarkers and novel Pancreatic Stone Protein (PSP) as well as their interference with septic events has not been addressed to literature yet.

METHODS

Analysis of the influence of inhalation injury and ARDS on biomarker kinetics (PSP, procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive Protein (CRP), white blood cells (WBC)) in 90 patients admitted to Zurich Burn Center between May 2015 and October 2018 with burns ≥15% total body surface area (TBSA) over 14 days.

RESULTS

Twenty-five (27%) of 90 included patients presented with inhalation injury (median age 52 years [IQR 27], median TBSA 31.5% [IQR 21], mean ABSI-Score 7±3). At admission, only WBC demonstrated significantly higher values in the inhalation injury group (p=0.011). Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was present in 32% without association to the severity of inhalation injury (p=0.11). WBC, CRP and PCT failed to delineate inhalation injury related inflammation from septic progression at most time points. PSP was the strongest marker to identify septic patients both by its higher values and steeper increase over time (p<0.001).

CONCLUSION

Inhalation injury leads to an inflammatory response at a systemic level with alterations of biomarkers. While routine inflammatory markers demonstrated strong interferences between inhalation injury with its associated ARDS and evolving sepsis, PSP reliably identified septic patients in a setting of inflammatory turbulences secondary to inhalation injury.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Department of Trauma Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Intensive Care Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Reconstructive Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Surgery
Health Sciences > Emergency Medicine
Health Sciences > Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
Language:English
Date:1 March 2021
Deposited On:07 Dec 2020 15:13
Last Modified:23 Jun 2024 01:46
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0305-4179
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.burns.2020.04.039
PubMed ID:33272743
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