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The fate of orally administered sialic acid: First insights from patients with N-acetylneuraminic acid synthase deficiency and control subjects


Tran, Christel; Turolla, Licia; Ballhausen, Diana; Buros, Sandrine Cornaz; Teav, Tony; Gallart-Ayala, Hector; Ivanisevic, Julijana; Faouzi, Mohamed; Lefeber, Dirk J; Ivanovski, Ivan; Giangiobbe, Sara; Caraffi, Stefano Giuseppe; Garavelli, Livia; Superti-Furga, Andrea (2021). The fate of orally administered sialic acid: First insights from patients with N-acetylneuraminic acid synthase deficiency and control subjects. Molecular Genetics and Metabolism Reports, 28:100777.

Abstract

Background

In NANS deficiency, biallelic mutations in the N-acetylneuraminic acid synthase (NANS) gene impair the endogenous synthesis of sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) leading to accumulation of the precursor, N-acetyl mannosamine (ManNAc), and to a multisystemic disorder with intellectual disability. The aim of this study was to determine whether sialic acid supplementation might be a therapeutic avenue for NANS-deficient patients.

Methods

Four adults and two children with NANS deficiency and four adult controls received oral NeuNAc acid (150 mg/kg/d) over three days. Total NeuNAc, free NeuNAc and ManNAc were analyzed in plasma and urine at different time points.

Results

Upon NeuNAc administration, plasma free NeuNAc increased within hours (P < 0.001) in control and in NANS-deficient individuals. Total and free NeuNAc concentrations also increased in the urine as soon as 6 h after beginning of oral administration in both groups. NeuNAc did not affect plasma and urinary ManNAc, that remained higher in NANS deficient subjects than in controls (day 1-3; all P < 0.01). Oral NeuNAc was well tolerated with no significant side effects.

Discussion

Orally administered free NeuNAc was rapidly absorbed but also rapidly excreted in the urine. It did not change ManNAc levels in either patients or controls, indicating that it may not achieve enough feedback inhibition to reduce ManNAc accumulation in NANS-deficient subjects. Within the limitations of this study these results do not support a potential for oral free NeuNAc in the treatment of NANS deficiency but they provide a basis for further therapeutic approaches in this condition.

Abstract

Background

In NANS deficiency, biallelic mutations in the N-acetylneuraminic acid synthase (NANS) gene impair the endogenous synthesis of sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid) leading to accumulation of the precursor, N-acetyl mannosamine (ManNAc), and to a multisystemic disorder with intellectual disability. The aim of this study was to determine whether sialic acid supplementation might be a therapeutic avenue for NANS-deficient patients.

Methods

Four adults and two children with NANS deficiency and four adult controls received oral NeuNAc acid (150 mg/kg/d) over three days. Total NeuNAc, free NeuNAc and ManNAc were analyzed in plasma and urine at different time points.

Results

Upon NeuNAc administration, plasma free NeuNAc increased within hours (P < 0.001) in control and in NANS-deficient individuals. Total and free NeuNAc concentrations also increased in the urine as soon as 6 h after beginning of oral administration in both groups. NeuNAc did not affect plasma and urinary ManNAc, that remained higher in NANS deficient subjects than in controls (day 1-3; all P < 0.01). Oral NeuNAc was well tolerated with no significant side effects.

Discussion

Orally administered free NeuNAc was rapidly absorbed but also rapidly excreted in the urine. It did not change ManNAc levels in either patients or controls, indicating that it may not achieve enough feedback inhibition to reduce ManNAc accumulation in NANS-deficient subjects. Within the limitations of this study these results do not support a potential for oral free NeuNAc in the treatment of NANS deficiency but they provide a basis for further therapeutic approaches in this condition.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Molecular Biology
Life Sciences > Genetics
Life Sciences > Endocrinology
Language:English
Date:September 2021
Deposited On:21 Oct 2021 13:39
Last Modified:25 Apr 2024 01:40
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2214-4269
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ymgmr.2021.100777
PubMed ID:34258226
Other Identification Number:PMC8251509
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)