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Teaching self-regulation


Schunk, Daniel; Berger, Eva M; Hermes, Henning; Winkel, Kirsten; Fehr, Ernst (2022). Teaching self-regulation. Nature Human Behaviour, 6(12):1680-1690.

Abstract

Children’s self-regulation abilities are key predictors of educational success and other life outcomes such as income and health. However, self-regulation is not a school subject, and knowledge about how to generate lasting improvements in self-regulation and academic achievements with easily scalable, low-cost interventions is still limited. Here we report the results of a randomized controlled field study that integrates a short self-regulation teaching unit based on the concept of mental contrasting with implementation intentions into the school curriculum of first graders. We demonstrate that the treatment increases children’s skills in terms of impulse control and self-regulation while also generating lasting improvements in academic skills such as reading and monitoring careless mistakes. Moreover, it has a substantial effect on children’s long-term school career by increasing the likelihood of enroling in an advanced secondary school track three years later. Thus, self-regulation teaching can be integrated into the regular school curriculum at low cost, is easily scalable, and can substantially improve important abilities and children’s educational career path.

Abstract

Children’s self-regulation abilities are key predictors of educational success and other life outcomes such as income and health. However, self-regulation is not a school subject, and knowledge about how to generate lasting improvements in self-regulation and academic achievements with easily scalable, low-cost interventions is still limited. Here we report the results of a randomized controlled field study that integrates a short self-regulation teaching unit based on the concept of mental contrasting with implementation intentions into the school curriculum of first graders. We demonstrate that the treatment increases children’s skills in terms of impulse control and self-regulation while also generating lasting improvements in academic skills such as reading and monitoring careless mistakes. Moreover, it has a substantial effect on children’s long-term school career by increasing the likelihood of enroling in an advanced secondary school track three years later. Thus, self-regulation teaching can be integrated into the regular school curriculum at low cost, is easily scalable, and can substantially improve important abilities and children’s educational career path.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
08 Research Priority Programs > Equality of Opportunity
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Uncontrolled Keywords:Behavioral neuroscience, experimental and cognitive psychology, social psychology
Scope:Discipline-based scholarship (basic research)
Language:English
Date:13 October 2022
Deposited On:21 Oct 2022 14:55
Last Modified:28 May 2024 01:40
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2397-3374
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-022-01449-w
Related URLs:https://www.zora.uzh.ch/id/eprint/229677/
Other Identification Number:merlin-id:22848