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Droplet Size-Assisted Polysiloxane Architecting


Varol, H Samet; Seeger, Stefan (2023). Droplet Size-Assisted Polysiloxane Architecting. Langmuir, 39(1):377-388.

Abstract

(Super)antiwetting shielding around engineering materials and protecting them against harsh environmental conditions has been achieved via growing various geometry polysiloxane (or silicone) patterns around them by using droplet assisted growth (DAGS) method, where the polymerization takes place inside of the water droplets acting as reaction vessels. The size and distribution of these reaction vessels are the main factors in making different geometry silicone patterns; however, very little is known about the fate of these droplets throughout the polymerization. Here, we proposed keeping the relative humidity (% RH) inside the reactor stable throughout the polymerization as a new coating parameter to force the size of the reaction vessel water droplets to be the same for building simple shape silicone rods with controlled geometry and distribution. In this manner, we grew simple geometry cylindric micro-rods on surfaces and could tune their length, diameter, inter-rod spacings, and thus the (super)hydrophobicity. Here, we also demonstrate that by changing the amplitude and the stability of the % RH, it is possible to fabricate different (super)hydrophobic nano-grasses, conical silicone micro-rods, and isotropic silicone nanofilaments (SNF). The proposed new way of tuning initial and in-situ reaction vessel droplet size can be used as a single factor to formulate different geometry silicone patterns with tunable dimensions, leading to different roughness and hydrophobicity. To a certain extent, the droplet-size-assisted silicone shaping in this work provides a new way to control the length, diameter, morphology, inter-rod spacing, and thus the (super)hydrophobicity of the silicone patterns, especially those in the shape of simple cylindrical micro-rods. This control over silicone architecting will help to prepare new (super)hydrophobic coatings with more controlled morphology and thus wettability; on the other hand, it will support surface scientists modeling the connection between surface geometry and (super)antiwetting of such irregular pillared surfaces that remain elusive.

Abstract

(Super)antiwetting shielding around engineering materials and protecting them against harsh environmental conditions has been achieved via growing various geometry polysiloxane (or silicone) patterns around them by using droplet assisted growth (DAGS) method, where the polymerization takes place inside of the water droplets acting as reaction vessels. The size and distribution of these reaction vessels are the main factors in making different geometry silicone patterns; however, very little is known about the fate of these droplets throughout the polymerization. Here, we proposed keeping the relative humidity (% RH) inside the reactor stable throughout the polymerization as a new coating parameter to force the size of the reaction vessel water droplets to be the same for building simple shape silicone rods with controlled geometry and distribution. In this manner, we grew simple geometry cylindric micro-rods on surfaces and could tune their length, diameter, inter-rod spacings, and thus the (super)hydrophobicity. Here, we also demonstrate that by changing the amplitude and the stability of the % RH, it is possible to fabricate different (super)hydrophobic nano-grasses, conical silicone micro-rods, and isotropic silicone nanofilaments (SNF). The proposed new way of tuning initial and in-situ reaction vessel droplet size can be used as a single factor to formulate different geometry silicone patterns with tunable dimensions, leading to different roughness and hydrophobicity. To a certain extent, the droplet-size-assisted silicone shaping in this work provides a new way to control the length, diameter, morphology, inter-rod spacing, and thus the (super)hydrophobicity of the silicone patterns, especially those in the shape of simple cylindrical micro-rods. This control over silicone architecting will help to prepare new (super)hydrophobic coatings with more controlled morphology and thus wettability; on the other hand, it will support surface scientists modeling the connection between surface geometry and (super)antiwetting of such irregular pillared surfaces that remain elusive.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > General Materials Science
Physical Sciences > Condensed Matter Physics
Physical Sciences > Surfaces and Interfaces
Physical Sciences > Spectroscopy
Physical Sciences > Electrochemistry
Uncontrolled Keywords:Electrochemistry, Spectroscopy, Surfaces and Interfaces, Condensed Matter Physics, General Materials Science
Language:English
Date:10 January 2023
Deposited On:04 Jan 2023 09:45
Last Modified:27 Feb 2024 02:54
Publisher:American Chemical Society (ACS)
ISSN:0743-7463
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.langmuir.2c02607
PubMed ID:36527409