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Tree mycorrhizal association types control biodiversity-productivity relationship in a subtropical forest


Deng, Meifeng; Hu, Shuijin; Guo, Lulu; Jiang, Lin; Huang, Yuanyuan; Schmid, Bernhard; Liu, Chao; Chang, Pengfei; Li, Shan; Liu, Xiaojuan; Ma, Keping; Liu, Lingli (2023). Tree mycorrhizal association types control biodiversity-productivity relationship in a subtropical forest. Science Advances, 9(3):eadd4468.

Abstract

Mycorrhizae are symbiotic associations between terrestrial plants and fungi in which fungi obtain nutrients in exchange for plant photosynthates. However, it remains unclear how different types of mycorrhizae affect their host interactions and productivity. Using a long-term experiment with a diversity gradient of arbuscular (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (EcM) tree species, we show that the type of mycorrhizae critically controls the effect of diversity on productivity. With increasing diversity, the net primary production of AM trees increased, but EcM trees decreased, largely because AM trees are more effective in acquiring nitrogen and phosphorus. Specifically, with diversity increase, AM trees enhance both nutrient resorption and litter decomposition, while there was a trade-off between litter decomposability and nutrient resorption in EcM trees. These results provide a mechanistic understanding of why AM trees using a different nutrient acquisition strategy from EcM trees can dominate in subtropical forests and at the same time their diversity enhances productivity.

Abstract

Mycorrhizae are symbiotic associations between terrestrial plants and fungi in which fungi obtain nutrients in exchange for plant photosynthates. However, it remains unclear how different types of mycorrhizae affect their host interactions and productivity. Using a long-term experiment with a diversity gradient of arbuscular (AM) and ectomycorrhizal (EcM) tree species, we show that the type of mycorrhizae critically controls the effect of diversity on productivity. With increasing diversity, the net primary production of AM trees increased, but EcM trees decreased, largely because AM trees are more effective in acquiring nitrogen and phosphorus. Specifically, with diversity increase, AM trees enhance both nutrient resorption and litter decomposition, while there was a trade-off between litter decomposability and nutrient resorption in EcM trees. These results provide a mechanistic understanding of why AM trees using a different nutrient acquisition strategy from EcM trees can dominate in subtropical forests and at the same time their diversity enhances productivity.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Multidisciplinary
Uncontrolled Keywords:Multidisciplinary
Language:English
Date:20 January 2023
Deposited On:16 Mar 2023 11:53
Last Modified:28 Jun 2024 01:44
Publisher:American Association for the Advancement of Science
ISSN:2375-2548
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.add4468
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)